1500 Hemi 5.7L vs 2500 Cummins 6.7L

ramffml

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Due to the cost of the special oil needed for the 6.4L and the that you can go almost double the number of miles between maintenance on the Cummins. The difference in total maintenance cost is not that different over the course of 100k miles if you do it yourself which is really easy to do. Taking it to the dealer will cost you especially if they change the fuel filters.
You need just one out of warranty expense on a diesel (if that) and you will never make your money back in savings no matter what you do.

Today's diesels are always the more expensive option. You buy them because you need the power, or because you want it, not because it's ever going to save you money.
 

SeppW

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Hello everyone,

I am having the hardest time in the world deciding what Ram to get next.
For a little back story, I currently have a 2020 Ram 1500 Limited on a company lease.
I am leaving this company for a new opportunity, and with that, comes having to purchase a truck.

I am doing so much research my brain is starting to hurt.

I know I would do well with a 2016-2018 Ram 1500 Sport or Laramie
I have the 1500 now, so I know, in general, capability, feel, and overall experience.

I am relocating for work to a more rural area, one with much more good diesel, more readily available.
We will be getting a house in a more secluded area, with more land, and more work to do to the land.
This means I might do some light equipment hauling, and overall, might need a greater payload.

Now, I am trying to compare the 1500 Hemi to a 2500 Cummins.
Looking around the same price range of less than $40k, I can find some trucks out there.

I have found 2500's anywhere from a 2014 to 2018 in a Tradesman to a Longhorn with anywhere from 80k miles to 170k miles.
I am trying to stay with model year 2014 and newer because that was the interior refresh year.

What would be some things to stray away from, to look for, and some overall things with 2500's with the 6.7

Should I stick with a 1500, would I be stupid to go with a 2500?

What are your experiences with these, would maintenance cost with a higher mileage diesel not be worth the extra capability?

I am in the process of selling my house, trying to get temporary living, buying a new house 3 hours away, starting a new job, about to have my wedding, and having to purchase a new truck, all in the span in about 3 months, so I just have a lot going on that is getting overwhelming, I just don't want to make the wrong, stupid decision.

Thank you for any help.
If you don't plan on towing or hauling heavy often, the 1500 would be the logical choice for car-like ride and performance. The 2500 diesel will ride like log wagon along with fuel, DEF, and oils, filters etc will add to operating expense. Then there is the culture of folks that think the only real truck is diesel-powered.
 

RLJ10X

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I think a Cummins/2500 is so cool, I'd buy one just for cool factor. What a beast!

But in reality, my 1500 will pull 10,000 pounds (just not very far, and not very fast). It rides really nice. It's a lot cheaper to buy and operate, all things being equal. As much as I'd like to have a diesel under the hood, I simply cannot justify it.

And I don't care for those pissy assed little 3 liter eco diesels.

Is a 5 liter in line six diesel in a 1500 with a six speed manual too much to ask for?! I think not. Too bad it'll never happen. Lol
 

SouthTexan

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You need just one out of warranty expense on a diesel (if that) and you will never make your money back in savings no matter what you do.

Today's diesels are always the more expensive option. You buy them because you need the power, or because you want it, not because it's ever going to save you money.


1) Cummins diesel engine warranty is 100k miles so there would be no out-of-warranty diesel engine repairs in the 100k timeframe I stated.

2) You DO NOT recoup any savings from diesel on fuel alone. It is a combination of resale value and fuel savings as shown in the chart below that I did a few years back. It actually needs to be updated because the value of my truck went up to $40k(I paid $50k and MSRP was $64K) when I looked it up a few weeks ago.

3) I have owned three Cummins diesel and none of them had any major repairs needed on them until around 200-250k miles. I currently have 140k on my truck with zero engine repairs besides a water pump that replaced due to a recall even though there was nothing wrong with the old one. My friends who own Powerstrokes and Durmax's, that is a different story.

However, I agree with you. You buy a diesel because you want more power even if it might costs you more money depending on your location and local prices. Similar to how a 6.4L owner pays more for that over the 5.7L in the 2500 or a 5.7L owner pays more for that over the base V6 in the 1500. Although in those options, the more powerful engines generally use more fuel, not less like the diesel option does.

To me, even if the diesel cost $2k over the course of 100k miles I would still think it is a good value for what you get in return.

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ramffml

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1) Cummins diesel engine warranty is 100k miles so there would be no out-of-warranty diesel engine repairs in the 100k timeframe I stated.

2) You DO NOT recoup any savings from diesel on fuel alone. It is a combination of resale value and fuel savings as shown in the chart below that I did a few years back. It actually needs to be updated because the value of my truck went up to $40k(I paid $50k and MSRP was $64K) when I looked it up a few weeks ago.

3) I have owned three Cummins diesel and none of them had any major repairs needed on them until around 200-250k miles. I currently have 140k on my truck with zero engine repairs besides a water pump that replaced due to a recall even though there was nothing wrong with the old one. My friends who own Powerstrokes and Durmax's, that is a different story.

However, I agree with you. You buy a diesel because you want more power even if it might costs you more money depending on your location and local prices. Similar to how a 6.4L owner pays more for that over the 5.7L in the 2500 or a 5.7L owner pays more for that over the base V6 in the 1500. Although in those options, the more powerful engines generally use more fuel, not less like the diesel option does.

To me, even if the diesel cost $2k over the course of 100k miles I would still think it is a good value for what you get in return.

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I've heard way too many horror stories regarding ALL modern diesels, including cummins. Not the old school pre def diesels, but all modern ones released in last 10 years or so. Injectors, fuel pumps, def related stuff, the list goes on.

Good to know the warranty is that long, I did not know that so thanks for pointing it out.

To be fair to your point, the hemi 5.7 is also not without issues, lifter tick apparently affects up to 5% by some mechanic estimations, but still, everything on a cummins costs more except perhaps fuel depending on area.

I'd rather drive a cummins, but own a 5.7.
 

SouthTexan

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I've heard way too many horror stories regarding ALL modern diesels, including cummins. Not the old school pre def diesels, but all modern ones released in last 10 years or so. Injectors, fuel pumps, def related stuff, the list goes on.

Good to know the warranty is that long, I did not know that so thanks for pointing it out.

To be fair to your point, the hemi 5.7 is also not without issues, lifter tick apparently affects up to 5% by some mechanic estimations, but still, everything on a cummins costs more except perhaps fuel depending on area.

I'd rather drive a cummins, but own a 5.7.


The injector and pump issues are mainly with PSD's and D-max's due to the CP4 pump and very sensitive piezo injectors. The CP4 pump is more sensitive to fuel contamination and also generally grenades when it fails sending metal shrapnel throughout the whole system. This requires you to replace or clean your whole fuel system including injectors costing upwards of up to $10k to fix. The PSD still uses the CP4 while GM went with a Denso HP4 that is looking to be more reliable.

The Cummins used the more reliable CP3 pump and electric solenoid injectors. Not only are these considerably less sensitive to contamination and last a lot longer, but the CP3 generally does grenade when it finally fails. All that happens is that you lose pressure and power meaning that your repairs are much less. Cummins did go to a CP4 for a few years(2019-2020), but went back to the CP3 in 2021 that was revamped for the higher pressures to meet the new emissions/power requirements.

I had to replace one CP3 at around 225k miles in my old 2003. The pump cost me about $500 at the time and I had it replaced in one afternoon. Although to be fair, I was pushing more fuel through that thing than stock levels due to the tune I was running so that likely cut the life span of the pump.
 
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ramffml

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The injector and pump issues are mainly with PSD's and D-max's due to the CP4 pump and very sensitive piezo injectors. The CP4 pump is more sensitive to fuel contamination and also generally grenades when it fails sending metal shrapnel throughout the whole system. This requires you to replace or clean your whole fuel system including injectors costing upwards of up to $10k to fix. The PSD still uses the CP4 while GM went with a Denso HP4 that is looking to be more reliable.

The Cummins used the more reliable CP3 pump and electric solenoid injectors. Not only are these considerably less sensitive to contamination and last a lot longer, but the CP3 generally does grenade when it finally fails. All that happens is that you lose pressure and power meaning that your repairs are much less. Cummins did go to a CP4 for a few years(2019-2020), but went back to the CP3 in 2021 that was revamped for the higher pressures to meet the new emissions/power requirements.

I had to replace one CP3 at around 225k miles in my old 2003. The pump cost me about $500 at the time and I had it replaced in one afternoon. Although to be fair, I was pushing more fuel through that thing than stock levels due to the tune I was running so that likely cut the life span of the pump.

Far as I know, cummins used the CP4 for a few model years too. They may have switched back to the CP3 now though.
 

SouthTexan

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Far as I know, cummins used the CP4 for a few model years too. They may have switched back to the CP3 now though.
That is what I stated. They used the CP4 with the new model but went back to the CP3 in the current 2021 and up trucks.
 
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