2013 with HOAT coolant in it?

Hemi395

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I went thru this a few years back with my 2013. Rather than take the chance I flushed it with distilled water and refilled with Mopar OAT.

What build date is your truck? Mine was 12/12
 

Southbay

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Build date is 5/13, so kind of far into the 2013 build cycle, which is why I am even more confused and don't trust what anyone says just based on color.
 

grizzstang

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I know for Jeeps they made the switch in 2013 model year. Early builds had HOAT later builds like mine had OAT. I would guess it was the same for everything.

OAT does turn orange/pink over time. The best way to tell is suck a little out and look at it in a glass jar. The overflow tank makes it harder to see the true color.
 

Burla

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Build date is 5/13, so kind of far into the 2013 build cycle, which is why I am even more confused and don't trust what anyone says just based on color.
You see the msds on either mopar coolant here...

Ten year Mopar Oat.

88-95% ethylene glycol
5% diethylene glycol
1% Hydrated inorganic acid, organic acid salts

5 Year Mopar HOAT

60%-100% ethylene glycol (Obviously is is way over 60%)
7-13% diethylene glycol
<10% Sodium tetraborate and benzoate

Never mind color, this is what makes up both coolants. If you read that thread, you see many options for different coolants broken down just like that. The lifetime and universal fills can be added to either because it is just the base, no additives. point being, peak global life will likely be added to either with no compatibility issues, because in fact it is only additives that cause issues, not base, when we are talking about hoat and oat. All the paper out there, it is additives that has caused the damages.

Here is peak global life msdss.

ethylene glycol 90-97%
diethylene glycol <5%

The only other additives are water and a bitterant so people dont drink it.

So you see a true universal coolant here, no additives. This is why this coolant is so popular at BITOG and by some long term members around here. There are no additives that can cause compatibility issues. It is simply coolant base. Now, the reason this is not factory fill is because you need additives in new vehicles until the coolant base populates the surface, on the surface is protected like in older rams, you no longer need the additives, just a universal coolant. Peak Gloabl Life is an option for you with either coolant, and is clear yellow so wont turn you coolant te rd brown. Peak global life if the one next to the range mopar hoat. At least your new coolant will be a version of orange yellow clearness.

antifreeze-colors-photo-mod_0-jpg.478011
 
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mtwofeathers

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Let me start out by saying I know this has been discussed a million times, I have read hours of stuff on it and still cannot figure what I have or what to do.

So everything I read says that starting in 2013 OAT is what was used. My coolant is clearly not purple, it is orange, not pink...orange. Truck is a 2013 HEMI, with 77K miles on it, if it's HOAT it's past needing to be flushed and if it's OAT is probably should be flushed soon too.

My problem is that I have read so many conflicting things that I have no idea if this orange in my truck is actually HOAT or the original orange OAT that may or may not have been produced and used before they changed OAT to purple. Took a cup full to a dealer, both parts guys were convinced it's orange HOAT. Tech who has worked there for 33yrs says it is definitely HOAT. My owner's manual says to use OAT, they ran my VIN and it specs OAT....but my factory fill is 100% orange and they all agreed and had no answer why orange HOAT would be in a 2013....except the 33yr tech said some early 2013's may have gotten leftover HOAT......may have. My manufacture date is 5/13. When I brought up that FCA possibly originally used orange OAT when it first came out, then changed the die to purple, they looked at me sideways.

Regardless, I need to do a flush anyway so I will. But is it best to re-fill with orange HOAT (5yr) or step up to what is specified for my truck and use the purple OAT? If I do use the OAT, how well do I have to flush the orange HOAT out to the point that I won't have a problem with OAT being put back in? Flush with water, run it up to temp driving around and repeat 2-3 times? Use a specific radiator flush chemical? Or is the only true way to keep is safe to re-use HOAT....but again, is there a chance that the orange in there is actually OAT that was originally orange??

Thanks for any help/answers. The only thing that keeps this from running around in my head is bourbon.
It is confusing to say the least. When ever I bought a truck. Old/new I dump it the same month and change to Evans waterless. Sure it costs more but has superior heat transfer and forget freezing. Unless your below -41. I use an engine heater on one truck only. I know that no matter what it will start. I have this bad habit of hunting moose and ice fishing, in the winter.
 

Dusty

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I know for Jeeps they made the switch in 2013 model year. Early builds had HOAT later builds like mine had OAT. I would guess it was the same for everything.

OAT does turn orange/pink over time. The best way to tell is suck a little out and look at it in a glass jar. The overflow tank makes it harder to see the true color.
I was going to comment on this point. There was a switch in coolant specifications mid-year 2014 builds. The color of the factory coolant didn't match up with what AutoZone was telling me. When the dealer's parts person looked up my VIN it called out for the newer coolant (Mopar 10-year, 150,000 mile, MS12106, 68163849AA) which is a bluish purple. Comparing it to the stuff I used in early 2014s which was orange in color (5-year, 100,000 mile, MS9769, 05066386AA).

Regards,
Dusty
2019 Ram 1500 Billet Silver Laramie Quad Cab 2WD, 5.7 Hemi, 8HP75, 3.21 axle, 33 gallon fuel tank, factory dual exhaust, 18” wheels. Build date: 03 June 2018. Now at: 062250 miles.
 

GTyankee

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Antifreeze color does not mean a thing
there are way too manufacturers that use whatever color they feel like

According to the 2013 Ram owners manual
all engines use OAT coolant

check page 711

FLUIDS, LUBRICANTS AND GENUINE PARTS
Engine Component Fluid, Lubricant, or Genuine Part Engine
Coolant
We recommend you use MOPAR Antifreeze/Coolant 10 Year/ 150,000 Mile Formula OAT (Organic Additive Technology)

Somewhere else, it mentions that you should not use Mopar OAT coolant made for Fiats, it uses a different I.D. #, for European vehicles
 
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