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2500 Cummins, good for towing or not?

Discussion in 'Heavy Duty' started by SBelt, Jan 13, 2021.

  1. SBelt

    SBelt Junior Member

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    Guys,

    I bought a new 21 Lariat 2500 Cummins w/off road pkg last week to replace my '16 F150 Ecoboost. I pull a 28ft enclosed car hauler and the F150 pulled it, but clearly struggled sometimes. It's not a business, it's just personal use for car shows and such, but the trips can be long. So I was pretty excited about moving up to a truck that has won the Truck of the Year award from MT, and comes with a high torque diesel motor for pulling my trailer.

    Admittedly in the wrong order, now that I have the truck, I've been watching reviews of the 2020 and 2021's on youtube. Surprisingly, I've seen a few reviews that explicitly say that if you're buying the truck to tow, then don't buy the 2500, buy the 3500. Some of the comments are due to the rear springs vs leafs between the two.

    Those of you that have 2500 Cummins and tow, what is your take. Did I make a mistake buying this truck for towing my car hauler?
     
  2. NH RAM

    NH RAM Senior Member Military

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    First, what is the tongue weight that you're needing to accommodate; that's the weakness of the 2500 with the Cummins. With a well-optioned truck, your payload is probably around 2000 pounds. As far as the specific towing quality of the Cummins, I can't speak to that as I have a 6.4.
     
    Zoe Saldana likes this.
  3. mtnrider

    mtnrider Senior Member

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    Towing with a 2500 cummins is excellent, but like mentioned you have to watch the payload. Given that you were towing that trailer with a F150 (not ideal but it pulled it) you should be fine with a 2500. Don't read too much into the payload, as long as you are not grossly going over it you will be fine.

    Of course a 3500 will give you more payload but a little rougher ride unloaded. 2500/3500 engine and drivetrain are the same unless you go with the HO motor and or aisin transmission so no real difference there between the trucks, just stiffer springs for the increased payload rating.

    .
     
  4. Wadejesu

    Wadejesu Senior Member

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    My son has a 2500/Cummings, he pulls same as you, He installed air bags in rear, big difference
     
  5. dhay13

    dhay13 Senior Member

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    Like was said, payload will be your issue. Don't worry about the coils spring capabilities. They work fine. You will probably have about 2000lbs of payload and you can find that on the yellow sticker inside your drivers door panel. There is nothing you can do to change that. Going over slightly won't really affect you but it won't be legal
     
  6. MADDOG

    MADDOG Snazzy Jeeper Administrator Supporting Member Military

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    Yup...it's all about the weight. A 2500 with the 6.4L HEMI has more payload than an equivalent 2500 with the Cummins because the diesel truck weight is higher due to that big chunk of iron under the hood. But, the 6.4L HEMI produces less torque which is a critical consideration.

    Payload is important so you need to know your weights:

    Truck empty weight or UVW - No fuel, passengers, tools, accessories, etc... in the truck
    Truck Gross Vehicle Weight Rating or GVWR - Weight of the truck with fuel, passengers, tools, accessories, etc... don't forget to add the Weight Distribution Hitch weight.
    Trailer UVW
    Trailer GVWR
    Trailer hitch weight - pin weight for a 5'vr, tongue weight for a TT
    GCVWR or Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating - Maximum weight of the truck (loaded) + pin weight or tongue weight + Trailer weight

    If the GVWR or the GCVWR actual weights exceed the specified weights in your truck's towing chart then you are gonna have to lighten up a bit.

    What is your trailer GVWR? We can figure out the truck and actuals weights added pretty easily.
     
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  7. Firebird

    Firebird Senior Member

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    I've had 6 Cummins 2500's, all pulled like a mule. I currently have a 6.4, also pulls like a mule. Unless that 28' trailer is freaky heavy, you should be in pulling heaven!
     
    Bisley45 likes this.
  8. SBelt

    SBelt Junior Member

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    Sorry, should have specified that. The car hauler is not a 5th wheel, it uses the class 5 hitch. Should be under 1000 lbs tongue weight.
     
  9. Travelin Ram

    Travelin Ram Senior Member

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    I have a 28’ enclosed car hauler myself. Unless you’re hauling very light vehicles I’d expect the tongue weight to be more than that. Typically 12-15% of trailer weight.
     
  10. mtofell

    mtofell Senior Member

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    Your truck is a great choice for your trailer. 2500s can usually carry just about any trailer tongue weight that you'd reasonably want to pull, even with the somewhat reduced payload due to diesel engine. The main 2500/diesel problem comes in with 5th wheel pin weight. As for coils v. leafs, again you have a great truck.

    I haul an 11K 5th wheel with my Hemi/coils and couldn't be happier with the carrying (pulling everything is another story entirely.... it's less than great but that's an engine/tranny thing). Anyway, coils are far better as a daily driver and I prefer to the leafs in my past HD. The coils are smooth and firm where the leafs are bumpy and jarring. I did add Firestone 5000 airbags but it was really optional not necessary. And I'm right at my 3000# payload with the 5th wheel attached. With your trailer I'd recommend trying it out first to decide if you need them. Overall, you have a great setup.
     
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