392 Swap - High Oil Temps - What Would You Do?

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Jwrigh12

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My oil temps run right around 190/195 at 90 mph on a hot day with this set-up on my 2014 4X4,but it's also a 5.7,so if it'd work to bring your oil temps down to where you want on a 6.4 i'm not sure.One benefit was my oil pressures did come up with the dual filter set-up compared to the first single filter set up i ran.That's with 3.55 gears,8 speed and a 31" tall tire to
Ummmm... sorry for quoting so far back in the thread... but what in the name of sweet slippery goodness is this?!...and where can I get one?

In Phx and I'm not loving the Temps I'm seeing at the moment.
 

tstein88

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So I've got a 2013 crew cab with 3.92 rear gears, 8HP70 swap, and 392 swap with MMX NSR cam, stock bottom end, ported manifold, etc. This oil (Redline 5w-40) runs HOT and we're not even into summer (I am in TX).

Little background - fall of 2020 my 165K stock 5.7 decided to tire out and with the cost of new trucks and what I had recently put into the truck, I decided to keep it and upgrade the engine. Then I spent the following 2 years dealing with weak transmission issues and ended up swapping to an 8HP70. I finally got everything buttoned up and have been daily driving the truck since last summer/fall. At that time, when cruising 90 down the highway, I noticed the oil would routinely get well over 240-250F and raise the coolant temp up to around 220F - I have a 185F coolant thermostat that actually works but the delta between the engine's fluids could only be so high. Even putting around, the oil would always get over 220F and would probably average around 230F with reasonable highway speeds (60-70MPH), the coolant could somewhat manage this delta and would lower a bit, maybe around 200F.

So late last fall I put on an oil cooler (34 row 59K BTU) with 185F thermostat in the filter sandwich adapter. One of the problems with this setup was I had to use the small oil filter due to the 1.75" thick sandwich adapter. I thought the oil pressure was down ~5 PSI but I think it may be closer to a 10 PSI drop with the large cooler, I foolishly wasn't recording oil pressure and temperature on my logs until recently. Well that cooler got me through winter (great temps, pressure not so much) but I never liked the small filter and stumbled across a low profile sandwich adapter that allowed me to use the large filter (RP 20-820) and I put this on around mid-January. I did not realize that this low profile adapter did not have a thermostat of any kind and was full flow to the cooler all the time. So I took that off after two weeks and removed the cooler entirely and have been running nothing for about a month now but this oil is HOT and our ambient temps are only around 80F in the evening when I drive home. The coolant gets up 200F with the oil well over 240F cruising at 90 MPH for around 15-20 miles. The coolant falls back down to 185-190F when cruising at reasonable highways speeds and the EOT falls to around 220-230F.

So without the cooler, for oil pressure I would have low 60s at cold start idle, high 60s into the 70s at cold cruising, high 50s/low 60s warm/hot cruising, and plummet to high 30s at idle (800 rpm for cam). So I adjusted my tune (HPT) to raise idle depending on oil temp and basically it is unaffected until around 176F I bump it up to 825 (800 base), 875 rpm at 212F, and 975 rpm @ 240F all scaling between and it keeps me in the high 40s oil pressure at warm-hot idle. I would prefer higher idle oil pressures but c'mon 975 rpm idle on a street engine with tiny NSR cam seems about the limit of reasonable.

So with that said, what are other 392 truck owner's experiencing? I know this engine has the oil squirters to keep the pistons cool and I am sure they are working which is heating the oil considerably more than the 5.7 but also lowering idle oil pressure. Any other engine I would be okay with that pressure but these engines, particularly the lifters and camshaft, don't like to idle with low oil pressure. What would you do in my shoes?
1. Run 5w-50 oil - I already have to keep this handy for the Roush-charged mustang so it would allow me to consolidate engine oils.
2. Remote dual filters (30-8A)
3. Run the large oil cooler I have with a remote dual filter setup, would be rather expensive in parts setup
4. Run a smaller oil cooler
5. Run a smaller oil cooler with remote filter(s)
6. Hellcat oil pump - last ditch effort, I don't really want to tear into this
7. Moroso High Cap oil pan - also don't really want to headache with this
8. Some fancy A2W setup - big $$$
9. Nothing, f'in send it!
10. Some combination of choices or other??
 

tstein88

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I finally ordered and installed the new honeycomb grille inserts this past week. The results at first seemed not all that great, other than aesthetics as the stock sport grille has not aged well. But after truly looking at the numbers and pushing it this morning, the results are a bit better than they initially appeared. When cruising on the highway in the AM with cooler temperatures, the ECT always ran at 185F while the EOT got up to maybe 206-210F after the strenuous 90MPH cruise. In the afternoons, ECT would be anywhere from 192-200+F and EOT usually 208-212F range, maybe a bit warmer if I had some road rage. Now with the honeycomb grille, the mornings only change was a few degrees drop of EOT, maybe in the 203F range, ECT was and is constant at 185F. In the afternoons though, I noticed a greater change. My ECT now doesn't go above 188F and my EOT is around 206F, maybe 208F briefly if I have to WOT pass someone camping in the left lane. These peak numbers are always quoted during/after the strenuous 90MPH cruise portion, everything always cools down once I get on the back roads with 65MPH average speeds. This brick, with these piston squirters, and these 3.92 rear gears, is a chore running at sustained speeds in this Texas heat.

Even more impressive was this morning's commute. This morning was a morning for assholes, myself included. Everyone felt the need to be extremely aggressive, myself included, and I was driving the wheels off of this thing, doing things I wouldn't do in my much newer and much more advanced-handling mustang. I am talking several WOT stints of winding out several gears, well over a dozen in a short period of time with no cool down times and the ECT never got above 190F and even then it was only momentarily, the EOT was running 208-212F and peaked momentarily at 216F, which for how I was driving, is a testament to the setup of these heat exchangers. Hell even the 8HP70's fluid reached 135F, which runs full time to the standard 6 speed condenser cooler, which usually doesn't ever get above 120F.

Anyhow, this is another testimony for how great the honeycomb grille flows over the more restrictive sport grille.
I too have a 3.92 on a 2016 1500. My engine runs real hot when towing in the heat. My oil temps are up to 260 degree F. I have bought a Derale oil coller but have been warned it swill not do much and may leak. I really have no idea what to do. I may speak to a race car builder I know. If anyone has any suggestions, please let me know.
 
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1SLwLS1

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Are you using a Derale kit or just a Derale cooler? The cooler itself will be fine, all of their fittings and hoses will probably be a restriction. What size is the cooler? It will do something but maybe not as much as you like if it is too small.
 

shortman

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Very interesting issue.... I just read/skimmed the entire thread....
OP... Just curious.... Why did you choose to run the thicker oil? The 6.4 calls for 0w-20 because of the closer tolerances of the forged internals.... Is it possible the thicker oil could cause additional heat?
 
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1SLwLS1

1SLwLS1

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Very interesting issue.... I just read/skimmed the entire thread....
OP... Just curious.... Why did you choose to run the thicker oil? The 6.4 calls for 0w-20 because of the closer tolerances of the forged internals.... Is it possible the thicker oil could cause additional heat?

The 6.4 calls for 0w-40. I am in Texas and we do not experience much cooler weather so I bumped up to 5w-40.
 

Andyrb720

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So I had the exact same experience as you with the doing a swap, the oil temps being high, I live in Texas, basically everything to a t. I ordered the exact same cooler as you and basically installed it exactly the same, I’m getting a cam phaser code now though and I think it’s because of the amount of oil I have. I just read that you now have your oil levels at about an inch above the normal safe levels on the dip stick. Is that still the case for you? Never any problems? It just makes me nervous to throw what seems to be a considerable amount of extra oil in the system but makes sense since the oil cooler is layed on the side and drains back into the system. I think this may be why I have been getting the p000b code. I’m also cammed and had hell getting that code to go away but finally did and installed the cooler and it came back. With the way I have my hoses ran and my cooler is in the middle and not to the side I don’t have much slack with the hoses and don’t really have a way to hang it down lower than the pan. I never really took this issue and kinda skimmed over it in the thread until I saw that code come back on so I was thinking about just filling it up until it was an inch above the top of the safe cross hatching on the dip stick. What do you think?
 
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1SLwLS1

1SLwLS1

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So I had the exact same experience as you with the doing a swap, the oil temps being high, I live in Texas, basically everything to a t. I ordered the exact same cooler as you and basically installed it exactly the same, I’m getting a cam phaser code now though and I think it’s because of the amount of oil I have. I just read that you now have your oil levels at about an inch above the normal safe levels on the dip stick. Is that still the case for you? Never any problems? It just makes me nervous to throw what seems to be a considerable amount of extra oil in the system but makes sense since the oil cooler is layed on the side and drains back into the system. I think this may be why I have been getting the p000b code. I’m also cammed and had hell getting that code to go away but finally did and installed the cooler and it came back. With the way I have my hoses ran and my cooler is in the middle and not to the side I don’t have much slack with the hoses and don’t really have a way to hang it down lower than the pan. I never really took this issue and kinda skimmed over it in the thread until I saw that code come back on so I was thinking about just filling it up until it was an inch above the top of the safe cross hatching on the dip stick. What do you think?
If you're using the exact same setup as me then it is about 1.25 extra quarts over stock. The drain back into the pan from the cooler isn't immediate. To verify levels I started it up, made sure everything was pressurized and running normally, then as soon as I shut it off, I checked the level on the dipstick. The oil drain back from the top of the motor also isn't immediate but it is much faster. With that in mind, I was shooting for the middle of the dipstick holes. With it sitting for several hours, allowing all of the oil to drain back into the pan, I checked the level again and that happened to be about at the kink above the top of the normal oil level on my dipstick. Knowing that value isn't as important as knowing the capacity of the system unless you're always checking the oil before you drive the vehicle after sitting overnight. I usually check it after the engine is running or has been recently running so I always just restart it and make sure all of the air is out and then immediately check the level upon shutting it off and shoot for the middle of the stick.

Another option, one I have looked into but haven't executed, is adding a check valve downstream of the remote filter mount to keep the oil from draining out of the cooler and back into the pan. Improved racing makes some high flow -AN check valves that could be utilized and then you would know for sure the correct oil level as you would use your dipstick like stock. You would also decrease oil starvation at startup with the cooler system always primed. One of the potential issues with the check valve is the added work when changing the oil, making sure to get all of that oil out of the cooler as well. My plan was to one day purchase one of those check valves and test if a magnet could operate the flapper allowing me to temporarily defeat the check valve during oil changes but I believe the flapper and internals are stainless so it is probably not magnetic. I would also fret about the orientation of the check valve as I would want it installed horizontally with the hinge up but there is no swivel so it would potentially be somewhat troublesome upon installation. You should be able to install it vertically too as that would eliminate any hinge orientation issues but would not allow you to mount it directly to the remote filter adapter - there are some potential hammer issues mounting it vertically though. I would not want to crack the lines open to drain the cooler every time. Another option would be to add a valve downstream in the lower line allowing me to drain it separately from the oil like I have on my mustang's catch can. Improved racing has a petcock inline fitting that shouldn't restrict flow and allow you to drain downstream of the valve. Another potential issue with the check valve would be pressure and flow losses. I am pretty sure the improved racing high flow check valve restriction would be minimal as the body is larger than the line but the loss would not be 0.

Is your cam a VVT cam? I have never had a phaser code but mine is locked out as I have the MMX stage 3 NSR cam which does not use VVT. Maybe that particular code the tuner turns off for non-VVT cams, I have never looked to see if that code is turned off in HPT and don't have my laptop with me today to verify.

Do you have any pictures of your installation, hoses, mounts, etc.?

If you're running an excessively low or high oil level, you should be able to hear it as you will heavily aerate your oil and cavitate your pump. It will sound like a whining power steering pump that changes note with engine RPM.
 
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1SLwLS1

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I had been meaning to post an update as this past weekend I finally ran out of the 20-820 filters and swapped the filter thread over to the 3/4-16 with a royal purple 30-8A. Definitely worth remote mounting for that filter alone. The additional pressure from the lower DP is definitely great. At hot idle, the oil pressure is about the same as the 20-820 as I suspect with such low flow, the filter is not a restriction at all. While cruising under moderate load (90 MPH), I am seeing about an additional 2 PSI of pressure and at WOT, I am seeing about an additional 4 PSI of pressure, which is definitely welcome as I am back into the 70# club at WOT with this oil cooler and filter combo.

Now I will gather some data in preparations for whether or not I pull the trigger on a check valve so I can compare and see what my losses are or hopefully, aren't.
 
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Andyrb720

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If you're using the exact same setup as me then it is about 1.25 extra quarts over stock. The drain back into the pan from the cooler isn't immediate. To verify levels I started it up, made sure everything was pressurized and running normally, then as soon as I shut it off, I checked the level on the dipstick. The oil drain back from the top of the motor also isn't immediate but it is much faster. With that in mind, I was shooting for the middle of the dipstick holes. With it sitting for several hours, allowing all of the oil to drain back into the pan, I checked the level again and that happened to be about at the kink above the top of the normal oil level on my dipstick. Knowing that value isn't as important as knowing the capacity of the system unless you're always checking the oil before you drive the vehicle after sitting overnight. I usually check it after the engine is running or has been recently running so I always just restart it and make sure all of the air is out and then immediately check the level upon shutting it off and shoot for the middle of the stick.

Another option, one I have looked into but haven't executed, is adding a check valve downstream of the remote filter mount to keep the oil from draining out of the cooler and back into the pan. Improved racing makes some high flow -AN check valves that could be utilized and then you would know for sure the correct oil level as you would use your dipstick like stock. You would also decrease oil starvation at startup with the cooler system always primed. One of the potential issues with the check valve is the added work when changing the oil, making sure to get all of that oil out of the cooler as well. My plan was to one day purchase one of those check valves and test if a magnet could operate the flapper allowing me to temporarily defeat the check valve during oil changes but I believe the flapper and internals are stainless so it is probably not magnetic. I would also fret about the orientation of the check valve as I would want it installed horizontally with the hinge up but there is no swivel so it would potentially be somewhat troublesome upon installation. You should be able to install it vertically too as that would eliminate any hinge orientation issues but would not allow you to mount it directly to the remote filter adapter - there are some potential hammer issues mounting it vertically though. I would not want to crack the lines open to drain the cooler every time. Another option would be to add a valve downstream in the lower line allowing me to drain it separately from the oil like I have on my mustang's catch can. Improved racing has a petcock inline fitting that shouldn't restrict flow and allow you to drain downstream of the valve. Another potential issue with the check valve would be pressure and flow losses. I am pretty sure the improved racing high flow check valve restriction would be minimal as the body is larger than the line but the loss would not be 0.

Is your cam a VVT cam? I have never had a phaser code but mine is locked out as I have the MMX stage 3 NSR cam which does not use VVT. Maybe that particular code the tuner turns off for non-VVT cams, I have never looked to see if that code is turned off in HPT and don't have my laptop with me today to verify.

Do you have any pictures of your installation, hoses, mounts, etc.?

If you're running an excessively low or high oil level, you should be able to hear it as you will heavily aerate your oil and cavitate your pump. It will sound like a whining power steering pump that changes note with engine RPM.
I only have pictures of the cooler part, I will take some pictures today after I get off of work. I went ahead filled it up to the first bend like you did, it is a vvt stage two cam. This phaser has been extremely stubborn and I almost just locked it out because I’ve had it break already within 1000 miles on a brand new crate motor(the first tuner I had tuned for a lockout like an idiot) but I wanted to try and utilize vvt for torque and what not. I’m hoping it just needs a tuning touch up from the oil psi difference or that it turned off the code after filling it up further with oil last night. I didn’t check the code yet because the light is on from removing the shudders so I need to read the code to know specifically which one is on. I know the that code will come on from low oil and when oil pressure is off.
 

Wild one

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I had been meaning to post an update as this past weekend I finally ran out of the 20-820 filters and swapped the filter thread over to the 3/4-16 with a royal purple 30-8A. Definitely worth remote mounting for that filter alone. The additional pressure from the lower DP is definitely great. At hot idle, the oil pressure is about the same as the 20-820 as I suspect with such low flow, the filter is not a restriction at all. While cruising under moderate load (90 MPH), I am seeing about an additional 2 PSI of pressure and at WOT, I am seeing about an additional 4 PSI of pressure, which is definitely welcome as I am back into the 70# club at WOT with this oil cooler and filter combo.

Now I will gather some data in preparations for whether or not I pull the trigger on a check valve so I can compare and see what my losses are or hopefully, aren't.
I sure like the 30-8A filters on my set-up.
 

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1SLwLS1

1SLwLS1

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If you're using the exact same setup as me then it is about 1.25 extra quarts over stock. The drain back into the pan from the cooler isn't immediate. To verify levels I started it up, made sure everything was pressurized and running normally, then as soon as I shut it off, I checked the level on the dipstick. The oil drain back from the top of the motor also isn't immediate but it is much faster. With that in mind, I was shooting for the middle of the dipstick holes. With it sitting for several hours, allowing all of the oil to drain back into the pan, I checked the level again and that happened to be about at the kink above the top of the normal oil level on my dipstick. Knowing that value isn't as important as knowing the capacity of the system unless you're always checking the oil before you drive the vehicle after sitting overnight. I usually check it after the engine is running or has been recently running so I always just restart it and make sure all of the air is out and then immediately check the level upon shutting it off and shoot for the middle of the stick.

Another option, one I have looked into but haven't executed, is adding a check valve downstream of the remote filter mount to keep the oil from draining out of the cooler and back into the pan. Improved racing makes some high flow -AN check valves that could be utilized and then you would know for sure the correct oil level as you would use your dipstick like stock. You would also decrease oil starvation at startup with the cooler system always primed. One of the potential issues with the check valve is the added work when changing the oil, making sure to get all of that oil out of the cooler as well. My plan was to one day purchase one of those check valves and test if a magnet could operate the flapper allowing me to temporarily defeat the check valve during oil changes but I believe the flapper and internals are stainless so it is probably not magnetic. I would also fret about the orientation of the check valve as I would want it installed horizontally with the hinge up but there is no swivel so it would potentially be somewhat troublesome upon installation. You should be able to install it vertically too as that would eliminate any hinge orientation issues but would not allow you to mount it directly to the remote filter adapter - there are some potential hammer issues mounting it vertically though. I would not want to crack the lines open to drain the cooler every time. Another option would be to add a valve downstream in the lower line allowing me to drain it separately from the oil like I have on my mustang's catch can. Improved racing has a petcock inline fitting that shouldn't restrict flow and allow you to drain downstream of the valve. Another potential issue with the check valve would be pressure and flow losses. I am pretty sure the improved racing high flow check valve restriction would be minimal as the body is larger than the line but the loss would not be 0.

Is your cam a VVT cam? I have never had a phaser code but mine is locked out as I have the MMX stage 3 NSR cam which does not use VVT. Maybe that particular code the tuner turns off for non-VVT cams, I have never looked to see if that code is turned off in HPT and don't have my laptop with me today to verify.

Do you have any pictures of your installation, hoses, mounts, etc.?

If you're running an excessively low or high oil level, you should be able to hear it as you will heavily aerate your oil and cavitate your pump. It will sound like a whining power steering pump that changes note with engine RPM.

Recently I have been doing more research into a check valve or accusump system to help keep the oil cooler full under cold starts so I can reduce the amount of time until full oil pressure is achieved minimizing wear and I just wanted to clarify something about this quoted statement - capacities, and how to check them - just incase someone stumbles upon this thread in the future (as I often find old threads across the internet that are inconclusive and/or wrong and they are so disappointing).

So, I think whenever I typed this up, that particular oil filter had a faulty or ineffective anti-drain back valve because all of the oil in the cooler shouldn't flow back to the pan after sitting for extended periods, for my configuration. Some of the oil on the upstream side of the filter will drain back into the pan via gravity but oil downstream of the filter wont be able to equalize with that level and flow back through the filter and into the pan if the anti-drain back valve is functioning, see attached OIL_COOLER_DRAIN-PDF. The route out of the cooler would equalize with the lowest opening in the main oil gallery, diagram is representative and not to scale. Once the thermostat in the remote filter mount starts to open/bypass or go "cold" that level still in the cooler would be able to eventually equalize with the lowest opening in the main oil gallery - depending on your oil temperature after you shut the engine off and thermostat setting, it may not take long for the thermostat to start to open in bypass mode. You can see in the diagram with a bad anti-drain back valve, much more of the oil would be able to make it back to the pan leaving a larger volume of air for the pump to overcome when starting.

Back to the statement to correct, whenever you're checking your oil level, the best time (most accurate) to do it would be when the oil is hot (thermostat is closed) and anywhere from 0-10 minutes after shutdown. You should be able to roughly determine increased capacity upon initial system installation, within a quart or so and gently drive it to get the oil up to temperature and the thermostat closed so you can shut it off and verify the full level in the most ideal condition, thermostat closed functioning anti-drain back valve, etc. Then after that, you can see where the level rises within an hour or more and note that particular level on the dipstick. For my system, it should not be at the notch as I previously noted.

The diagram is just roughly representative of the characteristics of my specific installation, the cooler being well above the pan and engine galleries, a dip with the thermostatic remote filter mount being slightly below pan, oil flowing into the bottom of the cooler and out of the top, thermostatic filter mount that opens/bypasses when cold, etc.

IMG_4347.jpg
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IMG_4349.jpg
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IMG_4378.jpg
OIL_COOLER_DRAIN.jpg
 

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Wild one

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Recently I have been doing more research into a check valve or accusump system to help keep the oil cooler full under cold starts so I can reduce the amount of time until full oil pressure is achieved minimizing wear and I just wanted to clarify something about this quoted statement - capacities, and how to check them - just incase someone stumbles upon this thread in the future (as I often find old threads across the internet that are inconclusive and/or wrong and they are so disappointing).

So, I think whenever I typed this up, that particular oil filter had a faulty or ineffective anti-drain back valve because all of the oil in the cooler shouldn't flow back to the pan after sitting for extended periods, for my configuration. Some of the oil on the upstream side of the filter will drain back into the pan via gravity but oil downstream of the filter wont be able to equalize with that level and flow back through the filter and into the pan if the anti-drain back valve is functioning, see attached OIL_COOLER_DRAIN-PDF. The route out of the cooler would equalize with the lowest opening in the main oil gallery, diagram is representative and not to scale. Once the thermostat in the remote filter mount starts to open/bypass or go "cold" that level still in the cooler would be able to eventually equalize with the lowest opening in the main oil gallery - depending on your oil temperature after you shut the engine off and thermostat setting, it may not take long for the thermostat to start to open in bypass mode. You can see in the diagram with a bad anti-drain back valve, much more of the oil would be able to make it back to the pan leaving a larger volume of air for the pump to overcome when starting.

Back to the statement to correct, whenever you're checking your oil level, the best time (most accurate) to do it would be when the oil is hot (thermostat is closed) and anywhere from 0-10 minutes after shutdown. You should be able to roughly determine increased capacity upon initial system installation, within a quart or so and gently drive it to get the oil up to temperature and the thermostat closed so you can shut it off and verify the full level in the most ideal condition, thermostat closed functioning anti-drain back valve, etc. Then after that, you can see where the level rises within an hour or more and note that particular level on the dipstick. For my system, it should not be at the notch as I previously noted.

The diagram is just roughly representative of the characteristics of my specific installation, the cooler being well above the pan and engine galleries, a dip with the thermostatic remote filter mount being slightly below pan, oil flowing into the bottom of the cooler and out of the top, thermostatic filter mount that opens/bypasses when cold, etc.

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Not quite sure what you're trying to say,other then you think you might have a bad filter. If you mount the cooler so the inlet/outlet ports are on the top,you shouldn't really have any drain back issues,but you'd have to probably pull the cooler every oil change to drain it,and then refill the cooler prior to starting. As you stated an accusump might be beneficial to your application,as you'd be able to pressurize the system prior to start up
 
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I had stated that the entire oil cooler would drain back to the pan and that the level would be higher than it should be. If someone followed that advice with a similar setup and their anti-drain back valve was functioning correctly, they could be overfilling the system.

When deciding on check valve and accusump, I put more thought into how it all works. I was just trying to give more information about the various states of the system so whoever is doing something similar down the road has better information available to make the right decision for their particular setup/situation.

I am pretty sure I have moved away from the complexity of the accusump and will add a check valve out of the filter take off as close to the pump outlet as possible to thwart any QC issues with anti-drain back valves. The accusump standard operation has some issues that I couldn’t get their technical department to resolve or clarify and would probably be another potential pressure loss on the system with a larger than acceptable swing in oil volume/level available in the pan causing more problems than it solved for a street truck.
 

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I had stated that the entire oil cooler would drain back to the pan and that the level would be higher than it should be. If someone followed that advice with a similar setup and their anti-drain back valve was functioning correctly, they could be overfilling the system.

When deciding on check valve and accusump, I put more thought into how it all works. I was just trying to give more information about the various states of the system so whoever is doing something similar down the road has better information available to make the right decision for their particular setup/situation.

I am pretty sure I have moved away from the complexity of the accusump and will add a check valve out of the filter take off as close to the pump outlet as possible to thwart any QC issues with anti-drain back valves. The accusump standard operation has some issues that I couldn’t get their technical department to resolve or clarify and would probably be another potential pressure loss on the system with a larger than acceptable swing in oil volume/level available in the pan causing more problems than it solved for a street truck.
You could do the solenoid valve version,that uses a pressure transducer to control the solenoid.Very similiar to a nitrous systems automatic bottle heater that uses a pressure transducer to turn the heater on and off,except you'd be turning a solenoid on and off.

 
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1SLwLS1

1SLwLS1

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You could do the solenoid valve version,that uses a pressure transducer to control the solenoid.Very similiar to a nitrous systems automatic bottle heater that uses a pressure transducer to turn the heater on and off,except you'd be turning a solenoid on and off.


I’m good with the actuation, I am worried about the fluctuation of oil volume in the active system. They wouldn’t give me numbers on how much the volume would swing at various pressures (50-70# range), just told me it’s probably online and to look for it. If you set your system capacity at idle, then when you go WOT later, the sump will hold more oil than you set the system up for and you will be short. If you charge the system to hold capacity with the pressure at WOT, it will be overfilled until you go WOT. That swing in volume is my concern, maybe it’s a few ounces, maybe it’s closer to 0.5-1 quart. Am I overthinking it? Definitely. But at over $1000 for a fairly complicated system, I didn’t think it was worth it just for a pre-luber, plus I didn’t like their go find it response.
 

Wild one

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I’m good with the actuation, I am worried about the fluctuation of oil volume in the active system. They wouldn’t give me numbers on how much the volume would swing at various pressures (50-70# range), just told me it’s probably online and to look for it. If you set your system capacity at idle, then when you go WOT later, the sump will hold more oil than you set the system up for and you will be short. If you charge the system to hold capacity with the pressure at WOT, it will be overfilled until you go WOT. That swing in volume is my concern, maybe it’s a few ounces, maybe it’s closer to 0.5-1 quart. Am I overthinking it? Definitely. But at over $1000 for a fairly complicated system, I didn’t think it was worth it just for a pre-luber, plus I didn’t like their go find it response.
I don't think you're quite comprending how they work,lol.They hold a certain amount of oil,whether they fill at 50 psi or 70 psi,and once it senses a pressure drop it releases that oil to maintain oil pressure in the engine,once pressure returns in the engines system,it refills again,for the next time your oil pressure drops.You can't compress oil/liquids which i think is what you're thinking happens.Think of a sealed 1 gallon pail,it holds 1 gallon whether it's at 1 psi or 100 psi of pressure
 
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1SLwLS1

1SLwLS1

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I don't think you're quite comprending how they work,lol.They hold a certain amount of oil,whether they fill at 50 psi or 70 psi,and once it senses a pressure drop it releases that oil to maintain oil pressure in the engine,once pressure returns in the engines system,it refills again,for the next time your oil pressure drops.You can't compress oil/liquids which i think is what you're thinking happens.Think of a sealed 1 gallon pail,it holds 1 gallon whether it's at 1 psi or 100 psi of pressure

The volume fluctuates, the other side of the piston is the air spring which pushes the oil out and you have to pre-charge it with air. That side compresses.
 

Wild one

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The volume fluctuates, the other side of the piston is the air spring which pushes the oil out and you have to pre-charge it with air. That side compresses.
The piston bottoms out,and won't retract any further unless you pressure it with way more air pressure then your oil system is capable of producing.It's been 25 years since i was around them,but you usually pressurized the system with what your oil system was capable of producing,so if your system was capable of 60 psi of operating oil pressure,you put roughly 50 to 55 psi of air pressure to the air side of the sump,once oil pressure dropped to whatever air pressure you had in it,it would start feeding oil into the engine.You didn't want anymore air pressure then oil pressure,as the sump would never fill
 
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