Front or Rear

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Fselrahc

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Maybe this has been posted...I can't find it.

When installing one set of snow chains on our PWs, assuming 4wd will be engaged, is it better to chain the front or rear.

Browsing the web yields as many opinions as there are trucks. I am hoping to get a consensus from the PW population.

I have not used snow chains in 4wd before but have had success chaining up the front end of a front wheel drive vehicle before. It pulls and steers where you tell it!
 

RamDiver

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Maybe this has been posted...I can't find it.

When installing one set of snow chains on our PWs, assuming 4wd will be engaged, is it better to chain the front or rear.

Browsing the web yields as many opinions as there are trucks. I am hoping to get a consensus from the PW population.

I have not used snow chains in 4wd before but have had success chaining up the front end of a front wheel drive vehicle before. It pulls and steers where you tell it!


If you need chains on a 4x4, why wouldn't you chain all 4 wheels?

.
 

Boondocks

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Front is better for steering. Rear is better for safety. In my experience, both are good for forward traction.

Remember the old days of rear wheel ABS? It’s the same principle. If your front tires are braking hard but aren’t skidding but your rear wheels begin skid, the rear of the truck may quickly spin to the side. It’s because a skidding tire loses directional control.

Do what I say and not as I do because rear is better for safety, but if I’m busting through deep snow at low speeds, I will install the chains in the front. If I’m using the chains for icy roads or on an icy lake, then I’ll install the chains on the rear.

You also have to be more careful with clearance issues with chains on the front. I believe our owners manuals advises that only the rear has clearance for chains.
 

olyelr

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There are perks to both. Seems like either could be better in certain situations, like boondocks was saying.

Just get another set of chains lol. Then u dont have to question it haaaaa.
 
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Fselrahc

Fselrahc

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If you need chains on a 4x4, why wouldn't you chain all 4 wheels?

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I can imagine what a beast it would be in the snow with all 4 tires chained up. I only have one set and, realistically, I won't see enough snow to warrant the 2nd set.
 
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Fselrahc

Fselrahc

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There are perks to both. Seems like either could be better in certain situations, like boondocks was saying.

Just get another set of chains lol. Then u dont have to question it haaaaa.
I like the way y'all think!
 

RamDiver

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I can imagine what a beast it would be in the snow with all 4 tires chained up. I only have one set and, realistically, I won't see enough snow to warrant the 2nd set.

I've never used chains as our provincial overlords have deemed them to be illegal on the roads.

As such, I've always managed quite well, mostly, with winter or AT tires. :)

There have been occasions where I believe chains would have been logical, smart, and much safer, but... the overlords don't agree or care about my opinion.

I'm curious where the line is between justifying 1 or 2 sets of chains. I find myself pondering the days when it was typical to only have snow tires on the drive wheels. :cool:

.
 
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Fselrahc

Fselrahc

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I've never used chains as our provincial overlords have deemed them to be illegal on the roads.

As such, I've always managed quite well, mostly, with winter or AT tires. :)

There have been occasions where I believe chains would have been logical, smart, and much safer, but... the overlords don't agree or care about my opinion.

I'm curious where the line is between justifying 1 or 2 sets of chains. I find myself pondering the days when it was typical to only have snow tires on the drive wheels. :cool:

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I would imagine that with all 4 wheels locked and chained it would be almost as good as having a tractor!

I live in Seattle and will not likely see enough snow to warrant 2 sets of chains.

Always on the drive wheels has been my experience as well. I am simply curious that when in 4WD, which drive wheels do you choose. The front has the weight to help them grab and the steerage to get you going in the right direction. However, as mentioned above, you don't want the back end coming around either.

My uneducated brain is thinking that chains (and 5 - 60lbs bags of sand) on the rear axle is an equalizer for the front without chains...or something like that. :)
 

RamDiver

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Are you required to have chains in certain areas in Seattle, as in your possession or installed on wheels?

Some provinces in Canada you're able to have them in your possession and other places like Newfoundland, they must be installed on the drive wheels when it snows.


I used to add weight in the winter to rear wheel drive cars and small to mid-sized trucks but not full-sized trucks.

I live in a rural area and sometimes wait up to 36 hours to get plowed after a big snow dump.

Just for perspective, I have vivid memories of plowing through the snow, near home in my Tundra while snow flew across the hood.

I occasionally would have weight in the box for scuba diving trips, firewood or other miscellaneous stuff and it may have been helpful for deep snow conditions but I didn't add weight when I wasn't moving stuff.

The mileage is marginal enough without the added weight. :cool:
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