Is it possible to increase toe capacity

Huffdaddy1

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Today 1500s are Is towing 13K. I have a 2010 ram 2500 with a 5.7 l. It only tows 8K. My truck with a diesel can tow 14K. My question is is there anything I can do to increase the towing capacity of my truck like swapping out a more modern transmission ..where is the weakness. Thanks
 

Oliver Closehauf

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It's everywhere in the driveline and suspension. There won't be one component not affected by the change of others if you are trying to push the limits.

The answer is yes you can, but whether or not you can cheaper than just buying a truck that has the capacity you want, I can't answer.
 

HemiLonestar

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1) Wrong section @G-Ride990
2) Toe as in foot, inject liquid into it; toe as in vehicle, mess with the front suspension
3) If you mean TOW, what @Oliver said pretty much sums it up; like he said, yes you CAN, but not LEGALLY
 

crazykid1994

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My 2017 1500 is rated to 10,000 lbs towing. Your payload should be higher for a 2500 over a 1500 but your limit is the 5.7 v8 in such a heavy truck. That’s what you’re real restriction is. You’re better off buying a new 2500 with the 6.4 v8 and 8 spd transmission if you plan on towing heavy. My next truck will be a 3500 srw diesel if I can. Or a 2500 6.4. They will be switching to a turbo i6 gas in most trucks but I have a feeling that will be severely underpowered in such a heavy truck like the 5.7 was.
 

GTyankee

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The Vehicles FRAME really decides the weight a vehicle can carry

Just like a building, you can buy a
tool shed that is made out of 2 X 2 & 2 X 3s
But a house is larger & they are made of 2 X 4s & 2 X 6 s

for instance a 1/2 ton pickup uses U channel & Box Tubular Steel, that say is like using 2" X 5" wood, all around the Frame
Where as a 3/4 ton would use 2 1/2" X 6"

The larger the Frame, the larger things like the Hauling Capacity & Braking Parts can be
 

canadiankodiak700

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The Vehicles FRAME really decides the weight a vehicle can carry

Just like a building, you can buy a
tool shed that is made out of 2 X 2 & 2 X 3s
But a house is larger & they are made of 2 X 4s & 2 X 6 s

for instance a 1/2 ton pickup uses U channel & Box Tubular Steel, that say is like using 2" X 5" wood, all around the Frame
Where as a 3/4 ton would use 2 1/2" X 6"

The larger the Frame, the larger things like the Hauling Capacity & Braking Parts can be
The frame is the least of the concerns in this category it's probably the strongest point even in the smaller 1500 series. Trim package transmission engine gear ratios all play a much larger part which is exactly why the tow capacity changes from one trim package to the other where they all use the same frame.
 

HemiLonestar

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The frame is the least of the concerns in this category it's probably the strongest point even in the smaller 1500 series. Trim package transmission engine gear ratios all play a much larger part which is exactly why the tow capacity changes from one trim package to the other where they all use the same frame.
And even wheel size. 3rd gens have a 1000 lb towing capacity difference between 20" and 17" wheels.
 

2003F350

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Sounds like OP has a higher-trim level truck coupled with a lower-GVW option. Such as a Laramie with no tow package.

My FIL had an '03 2500 that had no issue pulling a 13k fifth wheel, barely even squatted the truck. The 5.7 screamed at higher RPMs but handled it.

As for how to legally raise your GVW...you can get yourself re-rated in some states (I don't think all), but to actually be able to handle higher weights you'll need to upgrade tires/rims/springs/shocks/sway bars, and compare your axles frame to a higher-GVW rated truck.
 

pilgrim6

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Here is my experience--- I have had a 2011 RAM 1500 4.7 for 6 years. My travel trailer is right at the listed towing limit for the truck. I bought it when my tow vehicles was an F250 Diesel) I added Air Lift 1000 air bags just for an extra measure. I compared the build sheet of my truck to a friend's year newer RAM 1500 5.7 Hemi. I compared radiator, brakes, axles springs, everything I could think of that might affect the tow rating. The only differences i saw were the engine and the transmission.
On my first trip towing the trailer, I hit some "hills" on the original part of US 15. East of Chambersburg, PA, US 15 is a modern road with grades close to interstate highway specs. On these grades, everything was fine. Once you pass Chambersburg, however, the road reverts to the original US highway design and the grades were steeper. One grade was too steep--and even slowing down, the temps continued to climb with the "OVERHEAT" lamp ( I forget the exact legend because i only saw it once) lighting up just as we crossed the summit. Temps dropped immediately on the downhill side. I experienced no engine damage, but re-routed my future trips to stay on the Interstates with their better grades.
This Spring, during a heat wave and not towing anything, I noticed the temps rising. (I have an Ultra Gauge reader which lets me monitor lots of the computer functions--I keep water temperature always on display)--with outside temps approaching 100, the engine temp rose to 212. The normal range is 192-196. It was then that I noticed that I NEVER have heard the fan roar. (I used to have a F250 diesel and when that fan clutch engaged you could really hear it.) I verified that the resistance to turning the fan ( engine OFF!) was the same whether the engine was stone cold or up to operating temp.
I replaced the fan clutch. It is a quick and easy job--under 40 minutes and would be quicker if i had to do it again.
I immediately noticed the fan clutch when it engaged--not loud enough to scare pedestrians on the sidewalk, but loud enough to hear if you are paying attention.
I also installed and auxiliary transmission cooler, but once i saw the size of the oem cooler, that was probably overkill.
I just got back from 500 miles of towing in northern PA with no overheating at all--top temperature i saw was 208, but generally in the range of 194 to 198. That 208 was near the crest after a long climb. It was reassuring to hear the roar from the radiator fan.
I am no longer worried about towing at the factory limit. I think the fan clutch was the real problem all along.
One more thing--I have a SuperChips tuner and I used the 91 TOW tune fore the trip. This requires 91 Octane, so I blend equal amount of 89 and 93 octane. I averaged about 12 mpg while towing and 17.8 mpg otherwise.
 
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