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BenchTest

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Greetings Folks,

Like many others here, I've found this forum in search of others having similar experiences/issues and hopefully, ultimately, resolutions. I've owned my truck for about 16 months now. I purchased it used at about 43k miles. I now have 65k +/- miles. Here's what I can share so far:

Engine oil filter housing/cooler adapter - like millions of others, mine leaked. I opted to go with the Dorman Solutions fix. My thoughts on it were pretty simple - Mopar hasn't gotten it right in numerous attempts at revising the design, so I'm not going OEM. As a little background on my Pentastar experience, my former employer ran 70+ 3.6 Pentastars in various vehicles as part of their service fleet. I was a Regional Manager and dealt with quite a few of the regular failing items on these vehicles (filter housing being one). The replacement was pretty straight forward, albeit a bit aggravating having to do that on such a low mileage engine. No need to go into replacement details as that's been covered ad nauseam. I have about 12k miles on my replacement, operating in long duration road trips in various temps, with no issues to report. I feel the Dorman fix was the right decision. At this service, I replaced the thermostat/housing combination, radiator cap, and antifreeze following standard procedures for such. It was accessible during the housing swap and I'd rather do it sooner than later and while it's accessible.

Transmission service - I've read TONS and TONS of information from a bunch of different resources (including the manufacturer) in preparation for servicing the 8 speed ZF transmission. Again, more about me - I've been in a service/technical industry for 30+ years, some of which have been within automotive. Everybody has different and varying opinions on what the exact right thing to do is when servicing a transmission. I'll share what I did and my results. You may agree or disagree, but this is just what I did. The transmission pan and filtering unit are all-in-one on these transmissions from Mopar/ZF. There are different aftermarket units that provide for replaceable filter-only services going forward. I opted for a Mopar pan/filter combo as I believe this is a critical part that needs to adhere to specs. The original pan design had a drain port which was handy. However, the replacements/updated design from Mopar have eliminated this port. That's unfortunate as it makes futures services a bit more tidy (and drain/refills easier). I opted for Valvoline ATF for the refill. Some may balk at the idea of not using the specific ZF Fluid or Mopar re-bottled version. Again, ATF usage has been discussed ad nauseam as it relates to these transmissions. If money isn't a concern, then take the safe route and use OEM spec fluid from the OEM. I'm 10,5k miles since service with no discernible performance difference using Valvoline. For what it's worth to readers, I have used Valvoline for drain/refill type services on NUMEROUS vehicles for years without issue. Not all fluids are the same, yes I'm aware. Do your homework and make sure your refill product meets spec, confirm with manufacturer, etc. There is a specific procedure on the refill to achieve proper fill within temperature parameters. It's not like the good ol days of drain/refill/check with a dipstick (sad face here).

Fuel/air delivery system service - This could be a lengthy area, but I'll keep it as brief as possible. I run pump-delivered fuel system cleaner approximately every 5k miles. Better said, "add to tank" cleaner. I use Berryman's. Used routinely this PREVENTS deposit buildup. It's much easier to prevent buildup than to correct it. This is usually where people make the comment "well, if you use TOP TIER fuels, you don't need fuel system treatment". I can argue that extensively having 20+ years experience working with motor vehicle fuels, additives, and the like. In a perfect world, fuel delivered from the refinery/loading racks to the gas station would have the proper brand-specific additives in the proper ratios, thus negating the need for additional treatment. E.g. if you ALWAYS filled up at the same Chevron gas station every single time you needed fuel, and that station was always delivered fuel by the same transport, dropping the properly mixed fuel every time, you'd be getting the correct amount of Techron in your tank always, and you'd be set. That's just not reality. Especially if you drive cross-country or even across your state regularly. That's cleaning the fuel system from the tank forward. Obviously this isn't a 100% cleaning as no fuel treatment will remove ALL deposits. There is no "miracle in a can" - again, PREVENTION is way better than trying to CORRECT a neglected fuel system. This is all done preventatively. As I am not the original owner, I have no record of what had been done prior to me taking possession of the truck. During the tear-down process of replacing the oil filter housing, I took note of the intake ports and runners on the plenum and noticed some carbon/gunk buildup, which is inherent in the delivery system over time. Everything accessible was manually cleaned while apart. This includes the throttle body. If doing this process, take the time to do it correctly (throttle body relearn is a thing). If not, drivability issues will emerge. This is also true with APPS (accelerator pedal position sensor, it needs to know it's range from top to bottom (think decreased MPG, shift points incorrect/shift quality degradation, hesitation/idle issues).

Driving - I do a mix of highway driving and inner-city. I average about 18-19mpg regularly (unloaded, single or double occupied). I recently completed a 3200 mile trip and averaged 22.3 MPG. This consisted of mostly highway driving, mix of rolling hills and flat land, and in 0-25mph head and cross winds. There was quite a mix of all the above. The highway portions were averaging 75mph with approx. 450lbs of cargo (camping, offroad recovery gear) About 400 miles of this trip was at an elevation above 5000', some above 9000' (peaks near 12k'). Portions of the mountain driving were 4x4 Hi and a small portion in 4x4 Low (pulling steep grades offroad). All that combined, to average 22.3 MPG, I feel that it performed well. To propel a full-sized 4x4 truck with those criteria, I'm satisfied.

CEL - Check Engine Light (MIL - Malfunction Indicator Lamp for some folks). This machine has been through the gamut of EVAP codes. It's irritating, frustrating, aggravating, punch-it-in-the-face provoking. Crawl under it, remove a this or that, pop the hood, remove a this or that...start doing OHMs readings, checking volts, blah, blah. If you've ever chased EVAP, insert BURNING FIRE EMOJI here. So yes, I've been that route. Currently it's quiet, but I have ZERO doubts that it'll puke a P0JUNK code sometime soon. POOR design by Mopar (and all manufacturers really). Can't help but think it's a money grab. Does the "carbon footprint" really get offset when you compare all the EVAP parts that end up in a landfill to the amount of gas vapor being "reclaimed" by this garbage? I doubt it. Pure junk. I've travelled in excess of 2 million miles doing service work over my 30+ years. I've been through some vehicles and EVAP issues.

Slow/no flow during fuel delivery to gas tank -
Many of you have experienced this or read about it. I have done both. My truck was a giant PITA to fuel. .10 CLICK. .35 CLICK. 1.17 CLICK. *AGGRAVATING* Again, a lengthy topic. It could be your this valve not opening, it could that not venting properly, it could be a bad nozzle on the fuel dispenser (yes dispenser, not pump). So off I went checking the this's and that's all over the truck. Meter, OHMs, volts, blah. Guess what, still won't flow fuel into the tank as it should. After doing some looking around, research, and cussing, I found that there is a vapor canister filter on this truck. On this particular model, it's attached adjacent to the fill neck (which has been another source of fueling issues for Ram). Hmmm. Solid engineering, not. A paper filter element exposed to ambient moisture, dirt, and temp extremes, that doesn't show up as a serviceable item on anything that I've seen. I removed the housing and element. It was caked in dirt. I looked online and did not readily find any resource for this part or an actual OEM name for it (I eventually found it after some prolonged searching). Prior to actually finding the name for this part, I had gently tapped the filter in every direction to knock the excess dirt off, followed by low pressure compressed air from the inside out to help convince some of that dirt to go away. During this time I had read about the vapor canister developing a "blockage" of sorts as a result of prolonged restricted air passage from this very filter. I decided to drop the vapor canister and investigate (there is a lengthy history of these being problematic for several years/makes/models). That process wasn't difficult. Once the canister was out, i used LOW air pressure through a fabricated "fitting" to check air flow in and out. Initially it had a slight resistance. I "exercised" the air back and forth through the canister several times through all ports. Seemed that the initial flow resistance faded away. Did the charcoal some how clump up over time and then decided to release to smaller granules? IDK. Reassembled everything and guess what.... 20 gallons straight into the tank 3 different occasions without a single hiccup. Using the same dispenser, same nozzle, and basically the same flow rate (standard gas station nozzles should flow product at a rate of 8-10gpm).

I guess that's enough rambling for now. Hopefully this information is useful to somebody trying to figure out similar issues with their ride.

Thanks all,
BenchTest
 

Redfisher1974

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Good info, my 2017 3.6 with 70k on it has never leaked oil from filter housing, however I’ve always used torque wrench on it as not to over tighten it. I’ve replaced all fluids at 60k. Only failures since new has been AC compressor, transfer case shift motor and a few issues with bad grounds and such… nothing more frustrating then chasing intermittent chassis codes…
 
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BenchTest

BenchTest

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Good info, my 2017 3.6 with 70k on it has never leaked oil from filter housing, however I’ve always used torque wrench on it as not to over tighten it. I’ve replaced all fluids at 60k. Only failures since new has been AC compressor, transfer case shift motor and a few issues with bad grounds and such… nothing more frustrating that chasing intermittent chassis codes…
Bummer to read about AC compressor going out that early. Mine is a bit noisier than I'd prefer, but no performance issues that I can tell so far. I've done all fluids as well. The lovely stealership that I bought it from "certified" - which I inherently don't trust - I found condensate in the rear diff to the point of starting to have milky appearance in fluid with only 45k on the clock. That was immediately replaced, ran for 500 miles, and replaced again. That was 20k or so ago, no issues. Wiring issues are the worst. I've chased them for years. Intermittent = intermittent nightmares.
 
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BenchTest

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UPDATE on Dorman unit - I'm +/- 26k miles on the unit and FAIL. Crawled up under the truck tonight to do a quick pre-trip for upcoming weekend. Found oil running down the bell housing of the trans. Did some inspecting and traced it back to the POS filter housing. Tore the plenum and etc. crap off and out of the way so I could look further. Sure as $hit coolant and oil in the valley. I'm pretty hateful right now so I'm going to cut this short. But it appears the Dorman unit wasn't the fix I thought it would be. And before somebody asks, yes, I used OEM seals to install the unit. I have it torn down to "everything exposed" level right now and will try to determine what exactly failed tomorrow. Too mad and sweaty to figure it out tonight. EFF YOU Chrysler and your 15 attempts at getting this piece of crap engineered right.
 

Jeepwalker

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Good that you can do the work yourself. Sounds like you've been keeping on top of things and have the right attitude.
 

HunterCat

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UPDATE on Dorman unit - I'm +/- 26k miles on the unit and FAIL. Crawled up under the truck tonight to do a quick pre-trip for upcoming weekend. Found oil running down the bell housing of the trans. Did some inspecting and traced it back to the POS filter housing. Tore the plenum and etc. crap off and out of the way so I could look further. Sure as $hit coolant and oil in the valley. I'm pretty hateful right now so I'm going to cut this short. But it appears the Dorman unit wasn't the fix I thought it would be. And before somebody asks, yes, I used OEM seals to install the unit. I have it torn down to "everything exposed" level right now and will try to determine what exactly failed tomorrow. Too mad and sweaty to figure it out tonight. EFF YOU Chrysler and your 15 attempts at getting this piece of crap engineered right.
Well that sucks. This is a repair that I'm sure I'll have to do in the future since this particular failure seems to be so commonplace. I was planning on using the Dorman unit as well.

I do my own oil changes and I tighten the filter cap until it stops. No further and no real pressure on it. I don't know what the proper torque figure is but I'm sure I'm below it. I haven't had any leaks from the cap thus far. I doubt this will save me though since I think this problem goes beyond over tightening the cap. Your experience would suggest that. Just a poor design.

Please keep us updated on what you learn. Good luck.
 
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BenchTest

BenchTest

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Well that sucks. This is a repair that I'm sure I'll have to do in the future since this particular failure seems to be so commonplace. I was planning on using the Dorman unit as well.

I do my own oil changes and I tighten the filter cap until it stops. No further and no real pressure on it. I don't know what the proper torque figure is but I'm sure I'm below it. I haven't had any leaks from the cap thus far. I doubt this will save me though since I think this problem goes beyond over tightening the cap. Your experience would suggest that. Just a poor design.

Please keep us updated on what you learn. Good luck.
I had 70 +/- 3.6 Pentastars at my previous employer as part of our service fleet. Overtightening the filter cap contributed to a small portion of these failures. Most of the time it's seals between the block and cooler failing. They flatten out and degrade over the miles. OEM seals, Made in China seals, wherever Felpro makes them seals...they all seem to fail after hot/cold cycles and miles. It's a $hit design. Short of welding the damn thing to the engine, I don't know how they're going to get around this. Still at the same level of disgusted with this. Just got off phone with STEALERship. They want $330 to pick up their latest POS attempt at revising this part. That's just the cooler. No sensors. Think this is the 11th or 12th revision of this part. I like my truck, but this crap has me doubting I'll keep it much longer. This will be the 2nd repair by me in it's 80k odometer for this failure. Did 2 on my Chrysler van in 160k miles. Fleet wide we had a BUNCH of them repaired. Rambling at this point. Frustrated.
 
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BenchTest

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Finally sourced out parts. Going to try and reseal this Dorman unit. Don't see where the unit itself failed. Seems more like seals failed between block and unit. Hopefully I don't get burned going this route. Doing plugs & COP boots, PCV valve, and antifreeze exchange since I'll be this far into the engine, AGAIN.
 

mdc1990zr1

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Finally sourced out parts. Going to try and reseal this Dorman unit. Don't see where the unit itself failed. Seems more like seals failed between block and unit. Hopefully I don't get burned going this route. Doing plugs & COP boots, PCV valve, and antifreeze exchange since I'll be this far into the engine, AGAIN.
I don't have a 3.6 and absolutely no skin in the game whatsoever. I am not a RTV fanboy either, and always use a gasket when available. Is this a part, especially the Dorman metal one that has enough real estate to seal with some kind of gasket in a tube? Just a thought.
 
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BenchTest

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I don't have a 3.6 and absolutely no skin in the game whatsoever. I am not a RTV fanboy either, and always use a gasket when available. Is this a part, especially the Dorman metal one that has enough real estate to seal with some kind of gasket in a tube? Just a thought.
I don't think RTV would get the job done given the geometry of how things line up.
 
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BenchTest

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Well, it's back together. Went with Fel-Pro o-rings between filter adapter and block this time. The heat exchanger-to-filter adapter mating seemed dry so I left it alone. Dumped the OEM flat band clamp used to secure the coolant line to the adapter. That's an IGNORANT place to try and get band clamp pliers into and a crap place to try to get any tool into for monkeying with that sort of clamp. Installed a stainless worm gear clamp. We shall see. PCV valve done at same time. Original, while appearing worn, seemed functional. Since I was camped out in the engine bay already, figured I might as well get it done as it's a "100K service item". Replaced plugs. Is it reasonable to assume Mopar built these engines with factory installed Champion plugs? That's what came out. I went back in with the Autolite OEM units. Two things to note on plugs. The old ones came out and were gap checked, ranging from .055 - .062 (81k on the odometer at time of service). The new ones came out of the box and ranged from .040 - .055, and two of the new ones came out of the box at .044 which is Mopar spec. Interesting for "sparks plugs already gapped" era. I always check the new ones, no matter what the box says or what brand they are (I normally run NGK, Bosch, or Denso). Just found the range on the new plugs interesting. I'm surprised how much wear was showing on the 81k used plugs, being that they are supposed to be platinum. COP boots replaced as well, cheap insurance. OEM units appeared fine (no cracks, burns, discolors). Went for about a 30 miles drive. First 15 of it was 55mph, low RPM "oh hell I hope things are holding". The last 15 was 70MPH with 4K RPM shifts getting onto the highway and cruising at 70MPH after. Coolant and Oil temps stayed in the "normal for Pentastar" range and oil PSI stayed consistent 42PSI at speed. It's in the garage cooling down for the night while I'm doing the same in the A/C. It was 95 today and high humidity. I lost about a gallon of sweat today, I'm sure of it. Will crawl all around it in the morning to see what things look like.
 

Atcer2018

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Well, it's back together. Went with Fel-Pro o-rings between filter adapter and block this time. The heat exchanger-to-filter adapter mating seemed dry so I left it alone. Dumped the OEM flat band clamp used to secure the coolant line to the adapter. That's an IGNORANT place to try and get band clamp pliers into and a crap place to try to get any tool into for monkeying with that sort of clamp. Installed a stainless worm gear clamp. We shall see. PCV valve done at same time. Original, while appearing worn, seemed functional. Since I was camped out in the engine bay already, figured I might as well get it done as it's a "100K service item". Replaced plugs. Is it reasonable to assume Mopar built these engines with factory installed Champion plugs? That's what came out. I went back in with the Autolite OEM units. Two things to note on plugs. The old ones came out and were gap checked, ranging from .055 - .062 (81k on the odometer at time of service). The new ones came out of the box and ranged from .040 - .055, and two of the new ones came out of the box at .044 which is Mopar spec. Interesting for "sparks plugs already gapped" era. I always check the new ones, no matter what the box says or what brand they are (I normally run NGK, Bosch, or Denso). Just found the range on the new plugs interesting. I'm surprised how much wear was showing on the 81k used plugs, being that they are supposed to be platinum. COP boots replaced as well, cheap insurance. OEM units appeared fine (no cracks, burns, discolors). Went for about a 30 miles drive. First 15 of it was 55mph, low RPM "oh hell I hope things are holding". The last 15 was 70MPH with 4K RPM shifts getting onto the highway and cruising at 70MPH after. Coolant and Oil temps stayed in the "normal for Pentastar" range and oil PSI stayed consistent 42PSI at speed. It's in the garage cooling down for the night while I'm doing the same in the A/C. It was 95 today and high humidity. I lost about a gallon of sweat today, I'm sure of it. Will crawl all around it in the morning to see what things look like.

This sux brother. I feel for you as I just did mine about six months ago in January. It’s a pizz poor design and I too had hope the Dorman cooler would be the answer to the problem. I used the seals/gaskets supplied by Dorman so if/when mine fails again I’ll post up how the Dorman supplied seals held up. Hopefully the Fel-pro seals work for you.

Good call replacing the PCV as I did the same while I had more room to work in the engine bay. My original PCV didn’t look bad so it was more of a preventative measure. That dang wiring harness that’s clipped to it challenged my knowledge of swear words for sure.

I also replaced the plugs and indeed it had Champion Iridium plugs as OEM install. The wear on the electrode was significant for an Iridium plug. I found .55 to .62 gaps on the original plugs at 78k miles. My experience with iridium plugs in Asian econoboxes has always been positive and most of those plugs looked like they could go another 100k with little to no wear. I chose to stay with the Champions as the replacements and the pre gaps were same as you found, between .42 and .45. At least they were only $5 per plug on Rock Auto.

Hope you don’t have to do this repair again especially in the summer heat. Wasn’t too bad doing it in a 50F garage in January. Please keep us updated how the Fel-pro seals hold up as I may be using them in the future.
 
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BenchTest

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This sux brother. I feel for you as I just did mine about six months ago in January. It’s a pizz poor design and I too had hope the Dorman cooler would be the answer to the problem. I used the seals/gaskets supplied by Dorman so if/when mine fails again I’ll post up how the Dorman supplied seals held up. Hopefully the Fel-pro seals work for you.

Good call replacing the PCV as I did the same while I had more room to work in the engine bay. My original PCV didn’t look bad so it was more of a preventative measure. That dang wiring harness that’s clipped to it challenged my knowledge of swear words for sure.

I also replaced the plugs and indeed it had Champion Iridium plugs as OEM install. The wear on the electrode was significant for an Iridium plug. I found .55 to .62 gaps on the original plugs at 78k miles. My experience with iridium plugs in Asian econoboxes has always been positive and most of those plugs looked like they could go another 100k with little to no wear. I chose to stay with the Champions as the replacements and the pre gaps were same as you found, between .42 and .45. At least they were only $5 per plug on Rock Auto.

Hope you don’t have to do this repair again especially in the summer heat. Wasn’t too bad doing it in a 50F garage in January. Please keep us updated how the Fel-pro seals hold up as I may be using them in the future.
The Dorman unit seems fairly robust and overall the castings seem good. I wonder if they just cheaped out on the seals. My uneducated guess is that some global supplier makes generic o-rings to fit the seal between the block and oil filter adapter and every company that makes a replacement OFA just buys those same crappy o-rings and throws them in their kit in lieu of producing their own seals. Who knows. I've used Fel-Pro for various repairs for over 35 years and can't think of any time I've had a seal fail that was a seal fault. Hopefully these hold true to that history.

And as you said, I've pulled plenty of 100k iridium plugs that looked like they could keep on going, but the ones from this truck were definitely spent. I'm going to venture a guess and say they're probably not iridium and are more likely to be platinum. I could run the part number and find out, but I just don't care enough at this point to make that effort :)

I had a moment when I was under the truck working around the exhaust pipe to tackle the lower T25 bolt on the PCV Valve when I said "what dumb phukcing engineer decided the clip a wiring harness to a PCV valve? They should be drug out into the street and beaten with a torque wrench!". Seriously though, that small amount of room and then clip a wiring harness to a plastic PCV Valve? Ignorance.

Thanks for the reply. Hope yours holds up well. I'm slowly trying to build confidence in my truck, again. I'm prone to cross-country trips and that really puts a damper on things when a failure like this occurs.
 

aszumilo

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Would the Mishimoto one be any better than the Dorman? It is listed as 2011-2017. Not sure what difference 2018 vs. earlier models would be.
 
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BenchTest

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Would the Mishimoto one be any better than the Dorman? It is listed as 2011-2017. Not sure what difference 2018 vs. earlier models would be.
Didn't know Mishimoto was in that business. I've never heard of anybody using one. I just read the info at that link. They specifically call out using Viton o-rings. Interesting option. I hope I never have to try one out, but thanks for the info!

I think the 2017 limiter on the listing is due to a transition in sensor types/connectors. 2017 mid-year and prior used one type of sensor and mid-year 2017 and forward is a different sensor or connector is my understanding. I don't know first-hand, so take that for what it is.
 

aszumilo

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Didn't know Mishimoto was in that business. I've never heard of anybody using one. I just read the info at that link. They specifically call out using Viton o-rings. Interesting option. I hope I never have to try one out, but thanks for the info!

I think the 2017 limiter on the listing is due to a transition in sensor types/connectors. 2017 mid-year and prior used one type of sensor and mid-year 2017 and forward is a different sensor or connector is my understanding. I don't know first-hand, so take that for what it is.
Their site does mention the different sensor change for 2017. Maybe it would work on the 2018 with the newer sensors

*Chrysler transitioned to a new oil pressure sensor design during the 2017 model year. If you are installing this product on a 2017 vehicle, please verify that your original sensor's plug matches our sensor. If it does not, you may install your old sensor into the Mishimoto housing or purchase a new OEM sensor, part number 68295556AA and use it with our housing.
 

Atcer2018

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Would the Mishimoto one be any better than the Dorman? It is listed as 2011-2017. Not sure what difference 2018 vs. earlier models would be.

Oddly the picture they show on the website looks exactly like the one on my 2018. It has separate oil pressure sensor and coolant temp sensor. The sensors are new and pre installed whereas the OEM and Dorman units have no included sensors. Looks like a decent unit.
 

aszumilo

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Oddly the picture they show on the website looks exactly like the one on my 2018. It has separate oil pressure sensor and coolant temp sensor. The sensors are new and pre installed whereas the OEM and Dorman units have no included sensors. Looks like a decent unit.
I would bet the sensors are the only difference. Could probably swap them out for the newer sensors and be fine.
 

HunterCat

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I had 70 +/- 3.6 Pentastars at my previous employer as part of our service fleet. Overtightening the filter cap contributed to a small portion of these failures. Most of the time it's seals between the block and cooler failing. They flatten out and degrade over the miles. OEM seals, Made in China seals, wherever Felpro makes them seals...they all seem to fail after hot/cold cycles and miles. It's a $hit design. Short of welding the damn thing to the engine, I don't know how they're going to get around this. Still at the same level of disgusted with this. Just got off phone with STEALERship. They want $330 to pick up their latest POS attempt at revising this part. That's just the cooler. No sensors. Think this is the 11th or 12th revision of this part. I like my truck, but this crap has me doubting I'll keep it much longer. This will be the 2nd repair by me in it's 80k odometer for this failure. Did 2 on my Chrysler van in 160k miles. Fleet wide we had a BUNCH of them repaired. Rambling at this point. Frustrated.
That's not encouraging. I hope this latest attempt works out for you. Meanwhile, I'll be awaiting the inevitable oil stains in my carport as I watch Youtube videos on how to perform this repair :oops:.
 
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Reaction score
216
Location
Midwest
Ram Year
2018
Engine
3.6
That's not encouraging. I hope this latest attempt works out for you. Meanwhile, I'll be awaiting the inevitable oil stains in my carport as I watch Youtube videos on how to perform this repair :oops:.
The repair itself isn't awful. It's the navigating around the truck height and engine bay. My truck is stock height, stock 20" wheels, etc. and I'm 6' 2". It's just high enough off the ground to be a pain in the back to try and get to everything. You can reach 75% of what's needed from the left and right fender and over the radiator, but I found it "easier" to do a larger portion of it standing inside the engine bay (my weight on the crossmember/front stabilizer bar). I'd like to Mike Tyson punch the SOB who designed the setup. I'd like to double Mike Tyson with a side of Holyfield punch the SOB who put a band clamp on the hose for the inlet on the adapter, up against the head, down in the valley, where getting a band clamp plier or really anything is a pain in the a$$. Other than that, not bad. I've done these on Chrysler vans and they're just easier to do because you're not fighting contortion of your body and height of vehicle. Again, you'd think after ALL the years of Pentastar, they'd have figured this contraption out. It's a good device in concept, failed in execution.
 
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