RAM 2500 Cummins Payload Vs. Towing

Exdeus

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Hey Folks. Have a 2017 RAM 2500 Cummins Laramie. It has the 68RFE transmission with a max payload of 2,160 pounds and a 17,460 pound towing capacity (class 5 receiver) per my door sticker and VIN. I will have an AEV front bumper and winch on it shortly which will reduce it a few hundred pounds.

I typically carry a Four Wheel Camper in the bed but will be selling that and likely getting a smaller RV or travel trailer. In looking at the fifth wheels, it seems that they all will pretty well put me at or over payload. I am mostly seeing 1,700 pound hitch weights or more for fifth wheels, even the ones that claim they are "1/2 ton compatible" have a 1,200 pound dry hitch weight. Am I accurate in how I am looking at this? Surprised me a little bit seeing as it is the diesel with the towing package. My truck has a gooseneck hitch but would need to add a fifth wheel hitch if I went that route. Just a little surprised at hitch weight on this.

Now I could obviously get nearly any travel trailer to tow as my max hitch weight would be 1,200 pounds with the class 5 and I can tow up to the 17k (no desire to), but would never get close. Guessing the 5th wheels are really more meant for the 3500 - 5500 trucks? Was hoping to get a 5th wheel due to the easier/cleaner towing and handling, but all good if not. Just want to validate my logic here.

Thanks!
 

mtofell

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You've got it right. 2500 diesels are an oddball - they can PULL a house but can't CARRY much. If you really want your head to explode look into the axle weights vs. payload debate. Your RAWR allows you to carry much more weight than what puts you over on your payload. I'll leave it there and let you do your own research.
 

TMyers

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You've got it right. 2500 diesels are an oddball - they can PULL a house but can't CARRY much. If you really want your head to explode look into the axle weights vs. payload debate. Your RAWR allows you to carry much more weight than what puts you over on your payload. I'll leave it there and let you do your own research.
My 2500 CTD has a Gross of 10,000 lbs. But, my two axle weights combined equal 11,500 lbs. max. I use the axle weights because that's how I weigh it at the scales. I tow a 5th Wheel with my 2500. I'm a little over on my cargo sometimes but way under on my max rear axle weight. I load the camper, not the truck. I also use a Reese Goosebox as a hitch so I save some weight there.

The tow police go crazy over the Payload vs. Axle weights.
 

jejb

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Yep, lots of threads here about this subject. Search on "police" and I bet a few will come up. ;)

There is some law that restricts 3/4tons to a max on paper rating of 10K pounds. So even though they are capable of more, you could be in trouble if you are over that and get into an accident.
 

ramffml

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The GM 3/4 tons have a rating greater than 10K.

Maybe someone can answer the question "how does payload get determined"? Is it only a percentage of your axles? Because for example, the power wagon has the same axle ratings but far less payload due to the suspension, so clearly suspension plays a role too.

A rating is a rating, if you need to get out your calculator and worry about whether you're going over payload but not rear axle then perhaps you have the wrong truck for the job.
 

Exdeus

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My 2500 CTD has a Gross of 10,000 lbs. But, my two axle weights combined equal 11,500 lbs. max. I use the axle weights because that's how I weigh it at the scales. I tow a 5th Wheel with my 2500. I'm a little over on my cargo sometimes but way under on my max rear axle weight. I load the camper, not the truck. I also use a Reese Goosebox as a hitch so I save some weight there.

The tow police go crazy over the Payload vs. Axle weights.

How do you determine axle weights and ratings? Is the axle used standard across all 2500's for year/make/model?
 

Exdeus

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The GM 3/4 tons have a rating greater than 10K.

Maybe someone can answer the question "how does payload get determined"? Is it only a percentage of your axles? Because for example, the power wagon has the same axle ratings but far less payload due to the suspension, so clearly suspension plays a role too.

A rating is a rating, if you need to get out your calculator and worry about whether you're going over payload but not rear axle then perhaps you have the wrong truck for the job.

Thanks, but don't think that last statement is necessarily helpful or adding to the discussion. As I stated, I own the truck and we are making a change and I am looking to verify if I am in fact interpreting the information correctly as it was surprising given the towing capacity of the truck. It has a massive tow rating, but very low payload, which is a bit odd/interesting.

With that said, you are correct in the PW variations. I actually did not get the PW due to the payload being so low. I actually see people running those with Four Wheel Campers all the time which I guarantee is over payload as it is close enough with my truck, but you are correct, suspension absolutely has something to do with it as well. Brake size, engine, suspension, axles, etc.
 

ramffml

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Your right of course, I should have written that better and I didn't intend to be snarky. I was also addressing the other comments WRT "tow police" etc. My point is basically that payload is payload, and we shouldn't be worried about what that number means compared to axle ratings, and how much you can afford to go over payload as long as you're withing RAWR etc; IMHO once you reach that point in the discussion it becomes kind of clear to me that the wrong truck is being used.
 
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