Rounded tire

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Tulecreeper

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It's a trailer. Does not have a door sticker. Max on that tire is 75psi, which is what I run them at.

I'll try and get a picture of it to post.
There will be a sticker, probably on the tongue (unless it has worn off) that will tell you the original tire size and what PSI to keep them at. But, for most trailers the PSI should be kept at or close to the max listed on the sidewall - assuming you're using the original tire size listed on the sticker.
 

Gondul

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It's a trailer. Does not have a door sticker. Max on that tire is 75psi, which is what I run them at.

I'll try and get a picture of it to post.

Tire manufacturer should be able to provide a Load/Inflation table for your use in determining the proper air pressure needed for the load you are running.
 

Black-Wolf

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Rounding (wear) on the outside edges (even/symmetrical on both sides) of the tire is usually due to under-inflation. If it's in the center of the tire, it's usually due to over inflation. If you had an alignment issue, you'd get more wear on one side or the other (either camber is off, or toe in/out), or "skip marks" - spots where the tire has balder patches in spots along the edge or center, but other parts of the same edge or center, look fine. Here's an example of different tire wear patterns from https://carexamer.com/blog/6-types-of-tyre-wear-and-what-they-all-mean/
1707680075525.jpeg
 

Tulecreeper

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Tire manufacturer should be able to provide a Load/Inflation table for your use in determining the proper air pressure needed for the load you are running.
There is no load/inflation chart from any manufacturer regarding their trailer (ST) tires. ST are constructed differently than Passenger and LT tires, with a much stiffer sidewall that needs higher pressure to help maintain integrity and you can't treat them the same. That is why it is recommended to keep trailer tires inflated to maximum (or close to max) sidewall pressure.

Now, if you are using aftermarket Passenger or LT tires on a trailer - which isn't recommended, but I have heard of folks doing that - then you may have to go by a load/inflation chart. I have owned several different trailer types, and so have most guys I know, and I don't know of anyone who has put non-ST tires on a trailer so I have no experience with doing that.
 
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jejb

jejb

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Rounding (wear) on the outside edges (even/symmetrical on both sides) of the tire is usually due to under-inflation. If it's in the center of the tire, it's usually due to over inflation. If you had an alignment issue, you'd get more wear on one side or the other (either camber is off, or toe in/out), or "skip marks" - spots where the tire has balder patches in spots along the edge or center, but other parts of the same edge or center, look fine. Here's an example of different tire wear patterns from https://carexamer.com/blog/6-types-of-tyre-wear-and-what-they-all-mean/
View attachment 537293
Thanks. It is not more worn or cupped on the edges, or in the middle. I think I caught it before the crowned tire had time to do much tread damage. The tread was not deep on these tires even when new.

20240212_062832.jpg20240212_062849.jpg
 

Marshall

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kind of looks like it to me , hard to tell, looks lumpy .
I would take it to a shop and spin it on a balancer, if it is going ,should show up
BWL your truck looks like the one the idiot from NY drove in the ocean on one of the posts .
 

BWL

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kind of looks like it to me , hard to tell, looks lumpy .
I would take it to a shop and spin it on a balancer, if it is going ,should show up
BWL your truck looks like the one the idiot from NY drove in the ocean on one of the posts .
I hadn't noticed. Sounds like he at least has good taste in trucks.
 

2003F350

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That's a common failure mode for trailer tires, and it's a type of belt/tread separation. They're not really safe to run like that.

I have seen it more often on cheap tires, but I've seen it on the more expensive trailer tires too, so it's not just 'because it's cheap Chinese junk.' I can't say for sure, but I think it has more to do with side-loading the tires when turning/backing tight.
 

Scottly

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If something small...nail, screw, et...Punctured the tire, the air is no longer contained within the confines of the inner butyl liner. This allows air to escape and seep up between the tire plies, forcing them apart. This often occurs when a leaky tire is plugged and not patched.

Barring any punctures, the belts can also separate due to excessive heat build up from over-loading or under inflation.

Barring that, rusting steel belts will cause this as they expand. THAT is caused by improper curing temps during manufacture, most notably on cheap ching-chong tires.
 
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