Towing/Cargo Capacity Charts

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Tulecreeper

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I have the Stellantis 2023 Ram 2500 & 3500 Heavy Duty Tow Chart, and the 2023 Ram 1500 Classic (DS) Tow Chart. These took a while to find because there are a whole bunch of websites listing various different numbers, but I figured the Stellantis ones were as close as I was going to find to the most accurate. Since it seems these questions come up all the time I thought maybe they could be made into a sticky thread and as other members come up with the verified charts for other model years those could be added so eventually there would be one single place to find that information.
 

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2003F350

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Remember that these charts are for those combinations with NO ADDITIONAL OPTIONS than the base platform. As you add options to the model, payload goes down.

Also note that those charts don't list upper trim levels either. For instance, they don't show a 2500 4x4 crew cab short box OTHER THAN the Power Wagon, which is a double-whammy of lots of options AND a softer suspension. There's no info on a 2500 crew cab 4x4 short box with a Cummins, for example.

The only ACCURATE way to get towing/payload information for a truck is to either look at the tag on the door frame OR run the VIN through Ram's website, though these do not always match perfectly.
 

18CrewDually

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Remember that these charts are for those combinations with NO ADDITIONAL OPTIONS than the base platform. As you add options to the model, payload goes down.

Also note that those charts don't list upper trim levels either. For instance, they don't show a 2500 4x4 crew cab short box OTHER THAN the Power Wagon, which is a double-whammy of lots of options AND a softer suspension. There's no info on a 2500 crew cab 4x4 short box with a Cummins, for example.

The only ACCURATE way to get towing/payload information for a truck is to either look at the tag on the door frame OR run the VIN through Ram's website, though these do not always match perfectly.

No, the ONLY way to get your cargo capacity is to weigh your truck and subtract it from the GVWR.
Then take the truck's scaled weight and subtract that from the chart's CGVWR. That gives you the heaviest the trailer should weigh.
And finally, verify the trailers tounge weight is not higher than the cargo weight you did in the first step.

That is all you need to do in a nut shell using those charts above. Door jam sticker is only a reference as it sits on the lot. Listed "cargo capacity " on the sticker means nothing after you outfit your truck with accessories, tool boxes, ect.
Scale your trucks people! if you really want to know.
 
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Tulecreeper

Tulecreeper

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Remember that these charts are for those combinations with NO ADDITIONAL OPTIONS than the base platform. As you add options to the model, payload goes down.

Also note that those charts don't list upper trim levels either. For instance, they don't show a 2500 4x4 crew cab short box OTHER THAN the Power Wagon, which is a double-whammy of lots of options AND a softer suspension. There's no info on a 2500 crew cab 4x4 short box with a Cummins, for example.

The only ACCURATE way to get towing/payload information for a truck is to either look at the tag on the door frame OR run the VIN through Ram's website, though these do not always match perfectly.
While I agree with most of this, you cannot get any information regarding towing capacity from the door sticker...only the payload/cargo capacity. And that is only correct as it comes off the line with whatever you ordered on the truck. Adding any aftermarket accessories will subtract from that number. The base number to go by is the Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating (GCVWR) - the maximum weight that both your truck and trailer can weigh together. From that number, subtract your truck's GVWR and what is left is the max weight you can tow. Although even this is not an exact science.

The charts above are only for reference. But they are a better reference than wandering around the internet trying to compare multiple different charts from half the auto dealers in the country.
 

Ratman6161

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While I agree with most of this, you cannot get any information regarding towing capacity from the door sticker...only the payload/cargo capacity. And that is only correct as it comes off the line with whatever you ordered on the truck. Adding any aftermarket accessories will subtract from that number. The base number to go by is the Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating (GCVWR) - the maximum weight that both your truck and trailer can weigh together. From that number, subtract your truck's GVWR and what is left is the max weight you can tow. Although even this is not an exact science.

The charts above are only for reference. But they are a better reference than wandering around the internet trying to compare multiple different charts from half the auto dealers in the country.
But....depending on the type of trailer, towing capacity may be the least important and most deceptive number. I long ago got tired of correcting 1500 owners who think they can really tow 11000 pound travel trailers. Most will run out of payload capacity long before they reach the semi-mythical towing capacity.

Dealers usually include vin numbers in their online listings. When shopping, i just copy and paste the vin here:


The result will include truck specific payload and towing capacitiy as well as engine, rear end ratio, cab and bed configurations. The charts are an OK starting point, but there is so much variation betwe3n individual trucks, you really need the vin sp3cific info.

A rule of thumb ive come up with is that the most expensive truck typically has the worst towing capabilities. For example find a 2500 Limited, Diesel, Mega Cab and do a vin search on it. Often worse payload than the typical 1500.
 
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Tulecreeper

Tulecreeper

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But....depending on the type of trailer, towing capacity may be the least important and most deceptive number. I long ago got tired of correcting 1500 owners who think they can really tow 11000 pound travel trailers. Most will run out of payload capacity long before they reach the semi-mythical towing capacity.

Dealers usually include vin numbers in their online listings. When shopping, i just copy and paste the vin here:


The result will include truck specific payload and towing capacitiy as well as engine, rear end ratio, cab and bed configurations. The charts are an OK starting point, but there is so much variation betwe3n individual trucks, you really need the vin sp3cific info.

A rule of thumb ive come up with is that the most expensive truck typically has the worst towing capabilities. For example find a 2500 Limited, Diesel, Mega Cab and do a vin search on it. Often worse payload than the typical 1500.
I typed in my VIN and it did find my truck, but it simply says, "MAX PAYLOAD LB" and "MAX TOWING LB". The particular numbers it gives are really close to my actual caps, but may not be for someone with more junk added.
 

tron67j

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But....depending on the type of trailer, towing capacity may be the least important and most deceptive number. I long ago got tired of correcting 1500 owners who think they can really tow 11000 pound travel trailers. Most will run out of payload capacity long before they reach the semi-mythical towing capacity.

Dealers usually include vin numbers in their online listings. When shopping, i just copy and paste the vin here:


The result will include truck specific payload and towing capacitiy as well as engine, rear end ratio, cab and bed configurations. The charts are an OK starting point, but there is so much variation betwe3n individual trucks, you really need the vin sp3cific info.

A rule of thumb ive come up with is that the most expensive truck typically has the worst towing capabilities. For example find a 2500 Limited, Diesel, Mega Cab and do a vin search on it. Often worse payload than the typical 1500.
Exactly all this above. Charts are worth the money paid for them. Using the VIN search is great first step. But having weights fully loaded are just as important; people put steps, bed covers, the hitch, tools and boxes, etc. on the truck and don't take that into account.

And seconding the 1500s running out of payload long before they get near the max trailering weight.
 

hemismith

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Why is it so hard to find Ram towing capacity charts? The ones at the top of this thread don't contain the most common Ram configuration out there. I have no problem finding detailed charts for Ford.
 

2003F350

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Why is it so hard to find Ram towing capacity charts? The ones at the top of this thread don't contain the most common Ram configuration out there. I have no problem finding detailed charts for Ford.
Because they're basically a made-up number, and 'going off the chart' doesn't get you anywhere.

Your owner's manual should have a chart in it that lists what your truck's GCVWR is, meaning the max weight your truck AND a trailer can weigh. If you subtract your GVWR from this number, then that's what your max trailer weight is.

You should then look at what your payload and axle weight ratings are, compare to your vehicle's actual weight, and that will let you know how much hitch weight you can handle. I'm not here to argue payload vs axle ratings, pick which you want but one of the two is what you'll want to stick to. Things won't blow up if you go over either or both but it's playing with fire.

Now, after all that, it DOES NOT mean you'll ever be able to pull that much weight. If you're looking at an RV, unless you've got a 3500 or bigger I'd suggest using no more than 75% of that listed weight if you want a comfortable tow, might be a good idea to stay lower than that - your hitch weight on an RV is generally pretty static, it will vary a little depending on what you put in it but a LOT of the weight is fixed, and you absolutely CANNOT go off 'dry weights'. If you're looking at a flatbed or an enclosed tool/equipment trailer, you're more likely to be able to get close to that number because you can manually redistribute the weight to get your hitch weight correct.
 

hemismith

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Because they're basically a made-up number, and 'going off the chart' doesn't get you anywhere....

Thanks. That is good information and I am familiar with and agree with most of it. Certainly actual numbers need to be derived from the GVWR/GAWR/GCWR and the actual weights of the particular truck. I have had 4 trucks and 3 trailers and done all those measurements myself in the past.

But that doesn't help me now, because I don't have a truck, I am shopping for one, and the trucks I am looking at are 300 miles away. And that doesn't excuse the mfg from providing information. The net capacities are not made up, there is a standard but they are for a base configuration that no one actually has. I agree that you should never go over 75% of the listed towing capacity, and trailer dry weights when available are always several hundred pounds low. For truck payload it's a little more problematic, as a few hundred pounds for options can be a big deal.

What I'm looking for now though are more relative values. For example, the difference in towing capacity for different configurations. And rough payload numbers. It can vary great depending on engine and cab configurations, although they don't usually list it by trim level which can make a big difference as well. But what would be best I guess is if we compiled a list of actual weights.
 
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