Crappy glued brake pads

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18CrewDually

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This could easily turn into a thread like the ones about oil.
Personally I use Akenobo when I can. Just so happens my Napa sells them.
When buying pads, take them out of the box and look at the metal backer. I like to see painted or E-coated smooth steel with the isolators attached.
My opinion is if a store sees the used pad you brought in and automaically turns over a fresh box of pads, as if it is a common problem, I'd request to put the value of those pads towards an upgraded quality pad. I don't know O'Reilly quality or brands since we don't have them around here.
Just my thought.
But yeah, anything with steel can rust so it happens.
 

NETim

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My local independent parts house had Power Stop PB shoes, so that's what I went with.
 

Scottly

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None of the usual stammering that NAPA around here gives ya: "....
There was a time when you could walk into NAPA and get a better quality part than the other stores, if you elected to purchase the higher end quality stuff....Not any more. NAPA = Not Another Part Again
 

Jeepwalker

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Personally I use Akenobo when I can.

Supposedly their "premium" pads are what OEM Mopar uses. Low noise/low dust. They cost more but seem to last a long time. I've heard lot of great things.

I would prefer pad backing plates which are yellow cad plated. Yellow cadmium plating has self-healing properties & withstands salt effects a lot better. E-coated...salt will get under and spread underneath. Creating a mess. I don't remember in the 'old days' any brake pads with friction material riveted to yellow cad backing plates ever rusting like they do now. I'm sure Yellow cad is more expensive and more regulations, which is why most aren't Y/C plated anymore.
 

Ralph Mauro

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How is everyone replacing their parking brake shoes? I pulled mine off to free up parking brake cable that was seized in the shoe, and glued the lining back on the metal backing because it was also coming apart. It took two of us hours to remove free and lube everything up and reassemble the shoes. I'm wondering if it would be a lot easier to drain the rear diff and pull the axles out to change the parking brakes. That way one could replace rear seals and diff fluid at the same time. It's a really tight spot to get into without stretching springs.
 

NETim

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How is everyone replacing their parking brake shoes? I pulled mine off to free up parking brake cable that was seized in the shoe, and glued the lining back on the metal backing because it was also coming apart. It took two of us hours to remove free and lube everything up and reassemble the shoes. I'm wondering if it would be a lot easier to drain the rear diff and pull the axles out to change the parking brakes. That way one could replace rear seals and diff fluid at the same time. It's a really tight spot to get into without stretching springs.
When I replaced the PB shoes, I relied heavily on the brute strength and ignorance technique. There are some YT videos that help naturally.

Basically, you have to get the spring and adjuster off the one side of the shoes first. Then using pry bars, you pull the other end of one shoe out away from the pivot point. You'll be working against the two springs but it can be done. I had a good assortment of small pry bars on hand which allowed me to get in there and move one shoe off the pivot point on the backing plate. Once that's done, you can slide and wiggle the two shoes out to the side while the two springs are still attached. They will fight you all the way but eventually everything will come out.

Be sure to note how it's put together before you start pulling it apart. Take pics.

Re-assembly is basically the reverse of the disassembly. Pry bars are needed here again. You'll want to connect the two springs on the shoes before installing the shoes.

Once you've done one side, the other side is much easier. At least it was for me. I would recommend having the PB hardware kit on hand as well. The springs and stuff will be all kinds of rusty.

Edited to add: I forgot about the retaining clips. They are little (*&^&()&RE*@ to remove and replace. Those are no fun but can be done with nimble fingers and screwdrivers. Worst part of the job IMHO.
 
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Davis MacD

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I bought a power brake aftermarket setup in 2020, drums, discs and pads. They were the 1st set I ever bought that had breakin instructions that said to go easy the first 1000 miles to allow the adhesive to complete a heat bond to the metal shoe. I went easy for 20 miles and have had no problems but I'm not towing boats & trailers.
 

2Tallguy

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That should work. I would *grind* as much of that rust away with a grinder and a metal disc (not a wire wheel)...it'll get rid of the rust better and give the adhesive more texture to 'bite' onto. The rust will just come back anyway if you don't remove it. If you have a belt sander, remove the shoe from the vehicle and run it over the belt sander, with a course grit belt.

I'm with you ...riveted or 'spiked' backing is a good way to go. But good luck finding riveted pads/shoes anymore.

(..that's a 'shoe' btw...he he) :waytogo:
The rivets destroy the pad if not maintained.
 
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