Crew Cab Off Road Package towing capability

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Cudatali

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Hello there, new to the forum. I previously owned a 18 crew cab with the 5.7 3.92 2wd and I absolutely loved the truck. In 22 I decided to upgrade to the 5th Gen and I didn't really enjoy it, eventually got another 5th gen and nope. With that being said I am planning on taking advantage that Ram announced that the Classic will be back for 2024. I plan to order a 5.7 equipped crew cab 4x4 with Off Road package. As the title read does anyone know the towing capacity of that setup. I know sometimes when opting for off road packages manufacturers change to springs thus lowering the towing capacity. Hoping to get some insight from someone who may own a similarly equipped truck and knows their towing ratings. Thank you!
 

mikeru

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Which trim level are you considering? Tow rating and payload are very dependent on trim level. A base 4x2 Tradesman will have higher ratings than anything else above it. Options mean increased weight, which directly affects payload and tow ratings. So opting for 4x4 and the ORG will decrease those ratings. Your dealer should be able to tell you what the ratings will be for the truck you want to order.
 

CanRebel

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You can go to Ram Site, or use google look at 2023/2022 towing. It would likely be very close.

As @mikeru mentioned above it all depends on the trim level.

Example 2023

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Cudatali

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Thanks for the replys. I am aware how trim and vehicle options affect the towing. I guess I need to rephrase my question. My question is more towards the Off Road Package itself. Is it just a height change or does it use softer springs that would negatively impact towing capacity?
 

2003F350

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The only vehicles that uses softer springs for offroading that I am aware of are the Power Wagon and the Raptor. Every other 'off road package' is usually just different shocks and throwing some skidplates on, maybe tow hooks if they aren't standard. Even the Super Duty Tremor doesn't use softer springs, it just gets a 2" lift and 35" tires.

Your '18 2WD truck would have had a much higher payload and tow rating than any 4WD 1500 you can price out, I would guess. Mostly because it was 2WD and thus did not have the hundreds of extra pounds in a front axle, driveshaft, and transfer case, along with all the electronics to monitor and control said system.

Also note in the chart posted above, those are the MAX towing figures when properly equipped (no options, 3.92 gears, usually 2WD, etc.). Your average 1500 with a 5.7 and 4WD is likely going to have something like 3.55 gears, and if you option it up nicely your tow rating is likely going to be less than 10k, possibly closer to 8k. The real killer is going to be your payload and GAWR - more options (including 4WD and the skidplates in the 'off road package') are going to subtract from your payload, thus restricting the tongue weight of your trailer - presuming this is a camper you're looking at, a lower tongue weight typically means a smaller camper.

All that said, can you run over your payload and tow rating and get to your destination? Probably, many people seem to be doing just that. Is it safe? I would argue no, but then any time you step out onto the road you're taking a risk. It is all about mitigating that risk.
 

tron67j

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All good information above. Until you have a specific truck in mind and a VIN to run against the Ram website, you are not going to know the actual numbers. If your desired truck ends up with say 1600 pounds payload capacity, with 2 people and hitch ( and zero after market accessories) your remaining PC could be about 1,000 pounds, allowing a max (properly balanced) trailer of about 6,700 pounds. So with a 1500, it is critical to ensure your package/option choices do not adversely impact what you want to do with it. Not fun spending all that money and then riding the white knuckle express every time you load up for a relaxing vacation.
 

CanRebel

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I'm curios what you didn't like about the 5gen when towing? I have older classic and 21 Rebel. Towed with both. My Rebel with off-road , air, etc... have towed 10K TT with out any problems.

Besides the "look" and few options, they really aren't all that different. My classic has relatively low numbers vs Rebel. But Newer Classic vs Newer 5 Gen... about the same in my view.

Without more details, maybe 2500 is something you should look at.
 
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Cudatali

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Again thanks for the responses. I was just trying to find out if they came with softer springs. Thanks for shedding some light on the subject for me. I'm not trying to exceed any towing standards just simply gathering information. I didn't say I didn't like the 5th gen because of towing. I simply didn't like the truck; interior layout, it drove a bit different, etc... Not saying there was anything wrong with it or that it lacked. They simply didn't fit my taste. I was very happy with my 18, it just felt very comfortable and capable for my needs. Thanks again for all the input.
 

gnyland

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Hi guys, Any thoughts on how rim/tire size effect payload and or towing cap? I know after looking through Fords payload and towing guides they always increase both generously when going from 17's to 18" or 20" (so long as you have 18"/20" AT or 20" all season).
Curious why RAM, GM, Chevy don't distinguish this.
 

2003F350

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Correct. Just because the wheels are bigger doesn't mean they're rated for higher loads. Some designs/materials just can't handle it.
 

CanRebel

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Hi guys, Any thoughts on how rim/tire size effect payload and or towing cap? I know after looking through Fords payload and towing guides they always increase both generously when going from 17's to 18" or 20" (so long as you have 18"/20" AT or 20" all season).
Curious why RAM, GM, Chevy don't distinguish this.

Ram sort of does, they just don't show it as much as Ford does.

Example when I ordered my Rebel. RIM size was same, but there was 3 options for Tires. Depending which one you picked, tow/payload is different, even if everything else is same.

If the RIM size can handle more load or not, that could be possible as well. At same time, would increase weight.
 

tron67j

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Tires and rims don't increase payload and towing capacity. The trucks may have a special package that Ford has for some of its trucks.
 

CanRebel

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Tires and rims don't increase payload and towing capacity. The trucks may have a special package that Ford has for some of its trucks.

Yes they do. It can increase or decrease from the factory. Or decrease if you change them after the fact.
Everything you change on truck when you order from factory will change it or decrease it after the fact, if you add to it.

Ford's site is way better than Ram's, as other person posted, you can just change the tires/rims for different payload. Back when I got my Rebel, there was 2 options, payload changed depending which one you picked. Now they just offer one.

Payload is determined by GVWR minus AS BUILT weight(with options you pick)
 

nlambert182

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Yes and no....

Tires are unsprung weight, so they don't legally reduce payload because you choose a heavier/larger tire. Rims don't really reduce payload either for the same reason.

However, if you choose a tire with a rating less coupled with a rim with a lower weight rating than factory you could reduce payload that way. If you run a larger diameter rim with a smaller sidewall, you could run into an issue with a lesser weight capacity and impact payload. There are a lot of variables.

You could potentially run too large of a tire and reduce performance, which could impact towing from a powertrain perspective, but as far as what sits on/in the bed... payload remains unchanged. If you're strictly going by GVWR of the truck, then a heavier wheel/tire combo could impact payload. You'll see a lot of duallies running a smaller diameter wheel combo to keep the GVWR down to maximize legal payload.
 

2003F350

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Yes and no....

Tires are unsprung weight, so they don't legally reduce payload because you choose a heavier/larger tire. Rims don't really reduce payload either for the same reason.

However, if you choose a tire with a rating less coupled with a rim with a lower weight rating than factory you could reduce payload that way. If you run a larger diameter rim with a smaller sidewall, you could run into an issue with a lesser weight capacity and impact payload. There are a lot of variables.

You could potentially run too large of a tire and reduce performance, which could impact towing from a powertrain perspective, but as far as what sits on/in the bed... payload remains unchanged. If you're strictly going by GVWR of the truck, then a heavier wheel/tire combo could impact payload. You'll see a lot of duallies running a smaller diameter wheel combo to keep the GVWR down to maximize legal payload.

I think you're both talking the same thing - while a heavier tire doesn't really reduce the payload of the truck, if you're using it commercially it CAN. And likewise, if the rim/tire combination isn't rated to handle what the truck is rated for, then you need to go by the rating of the rim/tire, whichever is lower, to maintain safety.

Again, unless you're running commercially most LEO won't mess with you or question it, but there is the possibility (though rarely reported on) of being legally liable if an accident occurs and they can prove you were over a weight rating. Again, it's only a possibility, there are few if any recorded incidents of it happening, but there's a reason companies put those ratings out there - to absolve themselves of responsibility in the event something goes sideways. "Look! We put a rating on it! The user ignored it! We can't control that!" and all that.
 
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