Success lowering trans temp with @chaulk04 mod

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JamesCrowe

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You can make your own decisions based on how long you want the trans to last. You can either get the temp down or more frequent services. I'm happy my trans runs at 165°f.
If you're a person that trades it in before the warranty is up it probably doesn't matter to you. But I tend to keep vehicles for well past and upwards of 200k miles.

View attachment 532483
This chart is helpful.

So I'm curious to why the OEMs are designing trucks to keep transmission temps in the 180-190 range?

I have many years and two 6R80 transmission Ford's to draw from and the dials "normal" temp range was 50-220° F.
I added the OEM aux transmission cooler to my F150, my Transit had one from factory.
I changed the fluid at 92,000KM on the F150 and at I want to say 65,000km on the Transit.
Neither had shifting issues nor did the temp rise past the normal zone when towing. With that wide range in "normal" tho really tough to say what the actual temp was.

My Ram is brand new, I have just over 5000km on it now. If my Temps not towing are in the 180s, how exactly would I even begin to get it down without adding non factory parts etc right off the get go? I guess at this point I'll see what the temperature is in the spring once I'm towing, and if it stays in the 180s I'll carry on.

Don't have any Chevy or Toyota information to draw on here, but if every newer truck is running 180-200°F when towing, is there some sort of OEM conspiracy to kill transmissions?
 

JamesCrowe

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I asked about what is an ideal temp for the 8HP70, since I don't have tons of experience with it and Ford claimed a temp range of up to 220°F as "normal" in it's temp range for the 6R80. And a guy jumps on to telle how ludicrous that is like I designed the damned transmission and personally certified the temp instead of answering the question.
Real friendly bunch here so I appreciate your helpful response with information.
 

HEMIMANN

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This chart is helpful.

So I'm curious to why the OEMs are designing trucks to keep transmission temps in the 180-190 range?

I have many years and two 6R80 transmission Ford's to draw from and the dials "normal" temp range was 50-220° F.
I added the OEM aux transmission cooler to my F150, my Transit had one from factory.
I changed the fluid at 92,000KM on the F150 and at I want to say 65,000km on the Transit.
Neither had shifting issues nor did the temp rise past the normal zone when towing. With that wide range in "normal" tho really tough to say what the actual temp was.

My Ram is brand new, I have just over 5000km on it now. If my Temps not towing are in the 180s, how exactly would I even begin to get it down without adding non factory parts etc right off the get go? I guess at this point I'll see what the temperature is in the spring once I'm towing, and if it stays in the 180s I'll carry on.

Don't have any Chevy or Toyota information to draw on here, but if every newer truck is running 180-200°F when towing, is there some sort of OEM conspiracy to kill transmissions?

U.S. EPA CAFE mandates = government regulations.
 

Sherman Bird

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This chart is helpful.

So I'm curious to why the OEMs are designing trucks to keep transmission temps in the 180-190 range?

I have many years and two 6R80 transmission Ford's to draw from and the dials "normal" temp range was 50-220° F.
I added the OEM aux transmission cooler to my F150, my Transit had one from factory.
I changed the fluid at 92,000KM on the F150 and at I want to say 65,000km on the Transit.
Neither had shifting issues nor did the temp rise past the normal zone when towing. With that wide range in "normal" tho really tough to say what the actual temp was.

My Ram is brand new, I have just over 5000km on it now. If my Temps not towing are in the 180s, how exactly would I even begin to get it down without adding non factory parts etc right off the get go? I guess at this point I'll see what the temperature is in the spring once I'm towing, and if it stays in the 180s I'll carry on.

Don't have any Chevy or Toyota information to draw on here, but if every newer truck is running 180-200°F when towing, is there some sort of OEM conspiracy to kill transmissions?
Once upon a time, water heaters were made without pressure relief valves AND installed right in the bathroom adjacent to the bath tub. My mother nearly died as an infant in the early 1930's when her mother laid her next to the water heater to dry/ dress her. The water heater consumed all the oxygen in close proximity and my mom turned blue and stopped breathing. My grandmother's screams brought my grandfather up the stairs 2 at a time, so the story was told to me. Mom spent a few days under an oxygen tent in the St. Joseph's Hospital in Downtown Houston... and survived well.

Although high temperature transmission failures certainly don't present as hazardous to human health, the point is: What was once accepted engineering was changed for a variety of good reasons. So, just because a dial face shows a range of temps doesn't mean much.

And, yes, there IS a sort of "conspiracy". That being to make vehicles much shorter in life span to force consumers to buy new cars.... after all, those folks want to keep their jobs!

In summary, trans fluid will work happily in the 150 degree area and last for a VERY long time.... and not char-broil your tranny before it's time! :)
 

JamesCrowe

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Once upon a time, water heaters were made without pressure relief valves AND installed right in the bathroom adjacent to the bath tub. My mother nearly died as an infant in the early 1930's when her mother laid her next to the water heater to dry/ dress her. The water heater consumed all the oxygen in close proximity and my mom turned blue and stopped breathing. My grandmother's screams brought my grandfather up the stairs 2 at a time, so the story was told to me. Mom spent a few days under an oxygen tent in the St. Joseph's Hospital in Downtown Houston... and survived well.

Although high temperature transmission failures certainly don't present as hazardous to human health, the point is: What was once accepted engineering was changed for a variety of good reasons. So, just because a dial face shows a range of temps doesn't mean much.

And, yes, there IS a sort of "conspiracy". That being to make vehicles much shorter in life span to force consumers to buy new cars.... after all, those folks want to keep their jobs!

In summary, trans fluid will work happily in the 150 degree area and last for a VERY long time.... and not char-broil your tranny before it's time! :)
So a 1800s designed natural draft water heater (presumably natural draft by the timeline given) without a T&P valve (irrelevant note to the rest of the story) somehow used up all of the available oxygen in the room without roll out, to the point of suffocating an infant child, and this is your response to questions about automatic transmissions designed and built in the last couple of decades?

Are you legit trolling me?
 

RamDiver

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So a 1800s designed natural draft water heater (presumably natural draft by the timeline given) without a T&P valve (irrelevant note to the rest of the story) somehow used up all of the available oxygen in the room without roll out, to the point of suffocating an infant child, and this is your response to questions about automatic transmissions designed and built in the last couple of decades?

Are you legit trolling me?

Sometimes our posts diverge from the original topic or even from reality.

This is just the nature of forum life.

Enjoy the adventure and be happy. :cool:

.
 

NETim

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As has been pointed out repeatedly here, other vehicles (and there are many) using the ZF aren't superheating the ATF and seem to be getting along fine.

Ram is just trying to meet CAFE standards by thinning the fluid which apparently yields slightly better mileage.

Neither the EPA or Stellantis are concerned about long term consequences to the ZF in the 1500.
 

Wild one

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So a 1800s designed natural draft water heater (presumably natural draft by the timeline given) without a T&P valve (irrelevant note to the rest of the story) somehow used up all of the available oxygen in the room without roll out, to the point of suffocating an infant child, and this is your response to questions about automatic transmissions designed and built in the last couple of decades?

Are you legit trolling me?
Dude get over yourself,this is the way alot of threads transpire,either learn to accept it,or don't let the door hit you in the a$$ on your way out. You aren't that important to be trolled :Big Laugh:
Sherms one of the better posters on here
 
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