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Summit1

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Central NY
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2022
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Cummins 6.7
You are way over thinking it. Just get out and drive the truck and enjoy it. As long as you don’t jump in and try to roast tires when it’s cold your fine. I’ve owned several Cummins already and haven’t had any issues to speak of yet. Usually sell them around 200,000 miles. Just do the regular maintenance and the truck will last a long time. Enjoy it.
Exactly. One thing I have noticed with a lot of stuff is the tendency for users to over-engineer almost everything about it. Granted, I occasionally over-engineer things becaiuse I am somewhat of a geek. :)

My current 2017 Ram is the first Diesel I have owned, but I have driven numerous other Diesel powered vehicle over the years... mostly fire, rescue, and EMS apparatus. Quite often, when we are paged for a call, the truck/ambulance does not sit for long before heading out. It then remains running for most or all of the call (possibly several hours). No problems (not even issues) have been experienced with any of these engines.

After taking delivery of my truck, I drove it for several hundred miles prior to towing the camper (almost 8,000# plus the loaded truck) and everything was fine. As for the exhaust brake/break/brick/whatever, I occasionally use it even when not towing, especially on hills.

Along with the great sound, the Cummins TD is built to do work, whether recreational or professional; that's why so many folks love them. Also, I ignore the "expert" opinions related to initially carrying no weight, then increasing that on a logarithmic scale of some sort. I love the truck and will buy another when the time comes.
 
OP
OP
2022 Tradesman
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Santarosa, CA
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2022
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Cummins 6.7
Exactly. One thing I have noticed with a lot of stuff is the tendency for users to over-engineer almost everything about it. Granted, I occasionally over-engineer things becaiuse I am somewhat of a geek. :)

My current 2017 Ram is the first Diesel I have owned, but I have driven numerous other Diesel powered vehicle over the years... mostly fire, rescue, and EMS apparatus. Quite often, when we are paged for a call, the truck/ambulance does not sit for long before heading out. It then remains running for most or all of the call (possibly several hours). No problems (not even issues) have been experienced with any of these engines.

After taking delivery of my truck, I drove it for several hundred miles prior to towing the camper (almost 8,000# plus the loaded truck) and everything was fine. As for the exhaust brake/break/brick/whatever, I occasionally use it even when not towing, especially on hills.

Along with the great sound, the Cummins TD is built to do work, whether recreational or professional; that's why so many folks love them. Also, I ignore the "expert" opinions related to initially carrying no weight, then increasing that on a logarithmic scale of some sort. I love the truck and will buy another when the time comes.
Sounds great! Thx! Feeling better about everything The truck is awesome. I'm keeping it!
 

Goose55

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Cummins High Output 6.7L
When you idle un-burnt fuel will wash-off the protective layer of oil often referred to as "Cylinder Wash Down" which increases wear and reduces oil life. The higher the RPM the lower the impact of this effect.

When a diesel is very cold or very hot idling is recommended to reach a more moderate temperature.

To minimize the downsides of idling but get the benefits of idling a higher idle RPM is recommended (high idle).

When you're trying to to warm the truck you want a high idle with the exhaust brake on. The truck will high idle after two minutes on it's own if the coolant is still below 200f, but when you know it's cold out you can command the high idle after a few seconds of having the truck on.

When you're trying to cool the truck you want a high idle with the exhaust brake off. Enabling high idle will reduce the wear from having the truck idling.



The theory is a little time and care take it from lasting 300k to forever with a bit of accommodation.
What you have said is what I have heard, too, from those that really know the Cummins 6.7L. One of the 1st tricks I learned on my new Cummins was at one of my first Service Dept appts. I arrived early and pulled all the way in, front of the line, and left it idling. The Service Writer looked in at the mileage and tapped two 2 cruise control buttons and the idle went up. How kewl, I thought. On brief outings, if the engine has not reached operating temperature and you make a brief stop, it is better to let it high idle than shut it down. I have also benefited from gearing down if I am only headed out around my small town. This is because the engine loves to run at 1,800 - 1,900 rpm. If I do not gear down, with some areas posted limit at 25mph, the truck would lug along at only 1,000 - 1,100. By high idling during a brief stop and gearing down, the engine oil stays cleaner for longer, and I assume there are other benefits, as well. And one other thing. Though I live in a warm climate, I use my block heater often. Of course, not during our summers, but regularly during the cooler seasons (when overnight lows are below 50f). I don't plug it in overnight, but only for an hour or two before start up. I believe the engine very much likes these warmer start ups.
 
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OP
OP
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What you have said is what I have heard, too, from those that really know the Cummins 6.7L. If the engine has not reached operating temperature and you make a brief stop, it is better to let it high idle than shut it down. I have also benefited from gearing down if I am only headed out around my small town. This is because the engine loves to run at 1,800 - 1,900 rpm. If I do not gear down, with some areas posted limit at 25mph, the truck would lug along at only 1,000 - 1,100. By high idling during a brief stop and gearing down, the engine oil stays cleaner for longer, and I assume there are other benefits, as well.
I believe you can higj idle when stopped correct? Haven't figured out how to keep high idle during driving? Secret?? Gear down? Manually? Not to pass a selected gear?? Last question about idle because it's important correct? Blow by, glazing and so on.. when idling say at a short stop before reaching normal operating temperatures, would you recommend high idle or normal during those few minutes? Also, I've been realizing I'm lugging the motor around at 1000 or so rpms. Inform me how to keep up rpms like you said please. All good information to know about! Thx
 

airrecon

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Repton, AL
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2019
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Hemi 5.4
It's currently 74°F and I'm about to start her up. Just a minute should do correct? With or without exhaust break on? I don't believe high idle is needed correct?
Shutdown, just a minute if that long correct?

Today's start up .
Around 1 minute regular idle with exhaust brake on. Rpms regular.
Drove for a couple minutes temperature around 170 then cooled for 1 minute or less and shut it down. Start back up and drove back. Less then ten minutes drive time. Should I have let it idle while I waited for her to come out of the store? I hear its not good for the engine? Only curious because the engine wasn't up to regular temperature yet. If so, high idle for the few minutes? Just asking?? By the time I arrived back home I believe the truck warmed up to regular temperature and again idled for 30 to 69 seconds then shut it down. Any advice on this driving behavior???
First 2 pics are start up and departure temperature, 3 pic is arriving home temperature
Read the damned owners manual and do what it sez.
 

Goose55

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Cummins High Output 6.7L
I believe you can higj idle when stopped correct? Haven't figured out how to keep high idle during driving? Secret?? Gear down? Manually? Not to pass a selected gear?? Last question about idle because it's important correct? Blow by, glazing and so on.. when idling say at a short stop before reaching normal operating temperatures, would you recommend high idle or normal during those few minutes? Also, I've been realizing I'm lugging the motor around at 1000 or so rpms. Inform me how to keep up rpms like you said please. All good information to know about! Thx
Yes. To set high idle when stopped (with trans in Park) look at your 4 cruise control buttons on the right side of steering wheel. Tap the upper left one (which has has an emblem of a clock, with an arrow) and immediately tap the lower right one (Set). The idle will increase to 1,100 rpm. I have found sometimes it does not immediately activate and I have to do this twice. You can then also increase the idle further by tapping on "Set" again, and it will go up to 1,200 rpm. Tap again, and 1,300, etc. To maintain a higher rpm while driving at lower speed limits, as you drive off, use the "Gear Limit" toggle buttons on the lower right side of the steering wheel. In a 25 mph speed limit zone, I will gear down just as soon as I get going, which usually sets the limit to 3rd gear. If you forget to gear down, to prevent transmission surge, ease off the accellerator before gearing down. You are smart to be looking into these things. Your Cummins--and you--will be so much happier. Congrats on your new Cummins !! It is an marvel of modern day engineering. Did you know that about the only thing that comes out the tailpipe is water and nitrogen? Two naturally occuring elements in our atmosphere.
 
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OP
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Yes. To set high idle when stopped (with trans in Park) look at your 4 cruise control buttons on the right side of steering wheel. Tap the upper left one (which has has an emblem of a clock, with an arrow) and immediately tap the lower right one (Set). The idle will increase to 1,100 rpm. I have found sometimes it does not immediately activate and I have to do this twice. You can then also increase the idle further by tapping on "Set" again, and it will go up to 1,200 rpm. Tap again, and 1,300, etc. To maintain a higher rpm while driving at lower speed limits, as you drive off, use the "Gear Limit" toggle buttons on the lower right side of the steering wheel. In a 25 mph speed limit zone, I will gear down just as soon as I get going, which usually sets the limit to 3rd gear. If you forget to gear down, to prevent transmission surge, ease off the accellerator before gearing down. Congrats on your new Cummins !! It is an engineering marvel.
Thanks! I'll check into it, I'm familiar how to set high idle, but never geared down. Thought that was more of a 4x4 thing. Thank you for the advice
 

Goose55

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Thanks! I'll check into it, I'm familiar how to set high idle, but never geared down. Thought that was more of a 4x4 thing. Thank you for the advice
Gearing down in slower speed limits is doing about the same thing for the engine as high idling. It very much lowers the chance of un-burned fuel and soot from contaminating the engine oil, making the oil last longer, reducing uneccessary premature engine wear.
 

David F

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What I do, is i get in, start the truck and drive away , slowly. when i'm done, i stop , idle for a few seconds , shut down and walk away.
 
OP
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Works
Gearing down in slower speed limits is doing about the same thing for the engine as high idling. It very much lowers the chance of un-burned fuel and soot from contaminating the engine oil, making the oil last longer, reducing uneccessary premature engine wear.
Works great down shifting through the hills! Great advice! thanks brother!
 

Goose55

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Works

Works great down shifting through the hills! Great advice! thanks brother!
I suppose that downshifting while driving up a hill may not hurt the transmission at all. After all, why would there even be a "gear limit" toggle switch if using it could damage anything?

Your mileage is still below 1,000, right? After you reach 1,000 miles, put 2,000 - 3,000 pounds of something in the bed for awhile, and take it through those hills. From what I read in the Users Guide, this is called "running the engine in." Putting it under expected loads as part of the break in period. This increases cylinder temps to seat the piston rings. I did the same on my '19 3500 Cummins Duely, except it was 7,000 pounds (2 pallets) of bricks!!
 

Timsdually

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Just get in it, start it, fasten seat belt, and drive off.
Get to where you are going, put it in park, unfasten seat belt, turn off.
 
OP
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I suppose that downshifting while driving up a hill may not hurt the transmission at all. After all, why would there even be a "gear limit" toggle switch if using it could damage anything?

Your mileage is still below 1,000, right? After you reach 1,000 miles, put 2,000 - 3,000 pounds of something in the bed for awhile, and take it through those hills. From what I read in the Users Guide, this is called "running the engine in." Putting it under expected loads as part of the break in period. This increases cylinder temps to seat the piston rings. I did the same on my '19 3500 Cummins Duely, except it was 7,000 pounds (2 pallets) of bricks!!
Yeah, 340 miles. I shift up and down through the hills. 3rd 4th gear. Maybeb5th depending on rpms. Kept it about 1000 1200 1500 2000
 

Danny Phillips

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I drive the truck after I have good oil pressure. 2015 Ram 2500 HD 6.7 Cummins. When I go to town a couple times a week, I stop at the dumpster to offload garbage. While I'm at the dumpster I use the cruise to set the Idle at 1000 RPM's. then drive normal. I use the button on the gear shift to manually shift the tranny. Back in the 70's and 80's when I drove Peterbilt log trucks on cold start we had to wait for oil pressure to climb into normal territory. As for turbo cool down, I don't do anything out of the ordinary. Same when flying a Turbocharged airplane, it says 5 min. cool down time. But coming into the traffic pattern, landing and taxiing to park takes longer than 5 minutes.
 

BWL

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hemi 5.7
Exactly. One thing I have noticed with a lot of stuff is the tendency for users to over-engineer almost everything about it. Granted, I occasionally over-engineer things becaiuse I am somewhat of a geek. :)

My current 2017 Ram is the first Diesel I have owned, but I have driven numerous other Diesel powered vehicle over the years... mostly fire, rescue, and EMS apparatus. Quite often, when we are paged for a call, the truck/ambulance does not sit for long before heading out. It then remains running for most or all of the call (possibly several hours). No problems (not even issues) have been experienced with any of these engines.

After taking delivery of my truck, I drove it for several hundred miles prior to towing the camper (almost 8,000# plus the loaded truck) and everything was fine. As for the exhaust brake/break/brick/whatever, I occasionally use it even when not towing, especially on hills.

Along with the great sound, the Cummins TD is built to do work, whether recreational or professional; that's why so many folks love them. Also, I ignore the "expert" opinions related to initially carrying no weight, then increasing that on a logarithmic scale of some sort. I love the truck and will buy another when the time comes.
I believe the ambulances and fire trucks have different programming that prevents the derate that often occurs from idling for extended periods of time. https://www.cummins.com/engines/fire-emergency/vehicle-emissions-derate-exemption
 

Bricknhank

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Wow, this thread made me very happy that I ordered my new 2500 with a Hemi. I understand the more torque, towing power and better mileage of a diesel but it sounds far more complicated than I want to mess with.
 

Tim7139

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Haven't figured out how to keep high idle during driving? Secret??
If there was a need or benefit to doing this is would not be a secret.

Goose55 is saying instead of shutting his truck off when he gets out for brief stops and it's he leaves it high idling. Keep in mind you live in CA, and while having the truck you left running unattended stolen would be one way to address your longevity concerns once and for all it would present many new headaches.
 
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Tim7139

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I believe the ambulances and fire trucks have different programming that prevents the derate that often occurs from idling for extended periods of time. https://www.cummins.com/engines/fire-emergency/vehicle-emissions-derate-exemption
Incorrect. Emergency responders can set vehicles not to go into limp mode due to clogged DPF or DEF running out. The consumer faq from the link you used has the details.

The DFR provides relief to emergency vehicles by allowing engine manufacturers to prevent the engine from loss of vehicle speed, engine power (torque) due to abnormal conditions of the emission control system or by preventing those abnormal conditions from occurring during emergency response. Examples include:
Excessive exhaust backpressure from an overloaded Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF)
Engines with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) running out of Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF)
 
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