Help! What would you do next? Hemi misfire and low power

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Wild one

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I'm looking to upgrade my former practice of using dielectric grease to increase conductivity UNDER connections such as battery posts and clamps.

In my former practice, I've always used a very thin film of grease. I'm not sure why you would think I'd change that practice of application after switching to a conductive grease.

If anything, I would limit the thin film of conductive grease to the space under the clamps and wipe off any excess grease that gets squeezed out.

If applied correctly, there should be minimal excess.

I may continue to use a thin film of dielectric grease on the exterior of the battery clamps.

.
I use this spray on protector on battery posts,gives them a nice red finish,lol
Crappy Tire used to carry it to



 
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Elkman

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Dealer mechanics are 100% dependent on error codes and so cannot diagnose many problems with engines. I had a truck that would lack power and it had 28K miles on the engine. I went to 5 different shops and no one could determine what was wrong but they were happy to replace parts (without testing the ones on the engine) and charge me.

At 68K it became obvious that the engine had a failed head gasket that was letting coolant into the combustion chamber and this was what had been causing the performance problems. The symptoms were much like those with a failed plug or coil wire or an over rich fuel mixture. Very few mechanics know how to diagnose a problem such as this.
 

Burla

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I know somehow a thread on misfire and low power somehow because a friendly pizing contest about dielectric grease, but I'm pretty sure we all agree there is zero chance adding that to a battery cable would help this condition yes? So it gets real simple real fast imo. This "practice" isn't an enhancement to conducting electrical current between two connections. So when you look at it logically when it comes to the op's issue at best there would be no benefit to adding d grease and if Rick is correct it may hinder the flow of electricity. I would encourage the op to avoid d grease until his issue is resolved, and if he felt so motivated after the fact do some research on it then decide. I am very careful with my use of d grease for the record, but I do use it to avoid or cut down on stray current.
 

Wulf

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I'm looking to upgrade my former practice of using dielectric grease to increase conductivity UNDER connections such as battery posts and clamps.

In my former practice, I've always used a very thin film of grease. I'm not sure why you would think I'd change that practice of application after switching to a conductive grease.

If anything, I would limit the thin film of conductive grease to the space under the clamps and wipe off any excess grease that gets squeezed out.

If applied correctly, there should be minimal excess.

I may continue to use a thin film of dielectric grease on the exterior of the battery clamps.

.
Some people just change things without thinking through all the possible issues that change could bring. Wasn't intended to be a bad or nasty comment, just more of a heads up to you. Other than in here, I don't know you, and nothing personal, but I am not going to read all of your comments everywhere to gauge what kind of a person you are or what kind of a work ethic you have before replying to one of your comments.
 

Wulf

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Dealer mechanics are 100% dependent on error codes and so cannot diagnose many problems with engines. I had a truck that would lack power and it had 28K miles on the engine. I went to 5 different shops and no one could determine what was wrong but they were happy to replace parts (without testing the ones on the engine) and charge me.

At 68K it became obvious that the engine had a failed head gasket that was letting coolant into the combustion chamber and this was what had been causing the performance problems. The symptoms were much like those with a failed plug or coil wire or an over rich fuel mixture. Very few mechanics know how to diagnose a problem such as this.
I have seen this, but I have also seen those who actually take the time to properly diagnose a problem before just replacing parts until they get it right. Unfortunately, it is hard to tell who is who in this situation before you bring it to anyone, as many places have both kinds of these types of mechanics/technicians.
 

Wulf

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You're assuming the metal to metal contact wipes the connection clean enough to not create resistance,in most cases,there's still enough dielectric grease left on the contact points to create a resistance factor,and consequently heat.
From my limited experience (I am by no means claiming to be a car repair master mechanic, more the shade tree type), and from what I have read, in the specific case of replacing things like turn signal and brake light bulbs, the action of putting the bulb in, and the way the socket(s) are designed to work, they force a metal to metal contact between the two parts, and that is how electricity works in this case. These do not use transformers that can have only a magnetic field (but otherwise air gapped) to transfer electrical current.

That being said, the purpose for the dielectric grease, in this situation, is to prevent air (and oxidation) from getting to any exposed part of the metal in this connection, as typically, even though there is enough to make the bulbs work, there is also metal exposed to air, usually on the socket side of things, and in the case of the older (pre-LED style) bulbs, alot of them have a metal base as well, with pins that lock in when you push in and twist the bulb.
 

Wulf

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I know somehow a thread on misfire and low power somehow because a friendly pizing contest about dielectric grease, but I'm pretty sure we all agree there is zero chance adding that to a battery cable would help this condition yes? So it gets real simple real fast imo. This "practice" isn't an enhancement to conducting electrical current between two connections. So when you look at it logically when it comes to the op's issue at best there would be no benefit to adding d grease and if Rick is correct it may hinder the flow of electricity. I would encourage the op to avoid d grease until his issue is resolved, and if he felt so motivated after the fact do some research on it then decide. I am very careful with my use of d grease for the record, but I do use it to avoid or cut down on stray current.
There IS a benefit to adding the grease is the point of these posts. It depends on the situation. Since dielectric grease is intended to be used in this situation to keep air (oxidation) from getting to the electrical (and mechanical if the same thing) connection point and corroding it beyond functional use, I would say while the extent of the grease discussion got a little large for this, it still applies.
 

Wild one

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From my limited experience (I am by no means claiming to be a car repair master mechanic, more the shade tree type), and from what I have read, in the specific case of replacing things like turn signal and brake light bulbs, the action of putting the bulb in, and the way the socket(s) are designed to work, they force a metal to metal contact between the two parts, and that is how electricity works in this case. These do not use transformers that can have only a magnetic field (but otherwise air gapped) to transfer electrical current.

That being said, the purpose for the dielectric grease, in this situation, is to prevent air (and oxidation) from getting to any exposed part of the metal in this connection, as typically, even though there is enough to make the bulbs work, there is also metal exposed to air, usually on the socket side of things, and in the case of the older (pre-LED style) bulbs, alot of them have a metal base as well, with pins that lock in when you push in and twist the bulb.
Yea we're just gonna have to agree to disagree on this one.
 
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