Mopar or Shell Rotella oil for a 2022 Cummins?

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Just curious, my dealership uses Mopar products regarding maintenance for my new truck. My question is, should I purchase the Shell Rotella oil and Fleetguard filters and bring the oil with me when I get the oil change to possibly have them use this recommended oil rather than Mopar products? Does it Matter? Brand new truck only 4000 miles currently. Oil is black, which i heard is normal for diesel engines? Recommended oil change at 7500 miles. I'd like to hear from you all who know of these products and recommend the best choice. Thanks in advance!
 

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crash68

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Do the oil change yourself..you need an oil pan that holds better than 3 gallons and buy an oil filter plug to make it easier to remove without spilling.

Fleetguard is Cummins filter brand.
Cummins also recommends Valvoline Super Blue full synthetic oil but you can't go wrong with any of the big name diesel oils: Mobil Delvac, Rotella T6, Delo 400 XPS, Amsoil, etc.
 

06 Dodge

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Just curious, my dealership uses Mopar products regarding maintenance for my new truck. My question is, should I purchase the Shell Rotella oil and Fleetguard filters and bring the oil with me when I get the oil change to possibly have them use this recommended oil rather than Mopar products? Does it Matter? Brand new truck only 4000 miles currently. Oil is black, which i heard is normal for diesel engines? Recommended oil change at 7500 miles. I'd like to hear from you all who know of these products and recommend the best choice. Thanks in advance!
FCA allows dealerships to use any brand of bulk oil they want for non warranty oil changes, unless your paying for them extra to use Rotella T6 at $200.00 ( I used Rotella T6 5w40 for 4+ years in my 5.9 CTD and had no problems using it in summer 100 degree heat) that I now see dealerships near me advertising in the service areas, the Fleetguard Stratapore oil filter is better then the standard Mopar oil filter, my self I use and have used the best a Donaldson DBL 7349 aka ELF-7349 for 5 years in my old 5.9 CTD, you can get them for $18.89 each from Amazon when you buy 3 at a time, if you buy them one at a time they are $25.00 each: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N5VB8T...colid=VV4YUWM8TMNA&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it FYI last week my local Walmart had Rotella T6 for $24.72 gallon, not sure what your dealer will charge you to install you own oil and filter mine will do it for $50.00 or should say did back in January for my old truck so they may have a higher price but that's okay because I know the factory oil filter is a real beast to get off, so let them do the first one that way they get to have the fun of getting it off..
 
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Gr8bawana

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There is no reason to use synthetic oil in your truck. Also recommended does not mean "required". Who know how mush $$$ Valvoline paid Cummins to recommend their brand.
Any oil that meets Cummins spec will do the job. Why pay $35 a gallon for synthetic when you could Rotella T-4 conventional oil for $15 a gallon.
So many people use synthetic simply because they believe it's "better".
 

stevenP

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With the new and improved version of the cummins (2019 and up), they require either 10w-30 or 5w-40 oils. You cant use 15w-40 any longer. I usually use rotella. So with these revised specs, I am going with T6.
 

06 Dodge

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BTW do not Use 15w40 oil in your truck the 2019 & newer engines use either 10w30 or 5w40 synthetic oil due to Cummins changing the engine cam an the lifters to hydraulic.
 

06 Dodge

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There is no reason to use synthetic oil in your truck. Also recommended does not mean "required". Who know how mush $$$ Valvoline paid Cummins to recommend their brand.
Any oil that meets Cummins spec will do the job. Why pay $35 a gallon for synthetic when you could Rotella T-4 conventional oil for $15 a gallon.
So many people use synthetic simply because they believe it's "better".

Oh you mean the better wear & oil shear protection you get from Synthetic oil may not be worth it to you, but it is to those who want oil that protects the engine much better then what Dino oil can in stop & go traffic or heady duty towing...
 

Gr8bawana

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The owners manual makes no mention of a longer oil change interval for synthetic or dino, they are the same.
Dino oil will do the job just as well. Wear and shear protection in dino oil is not going to suffer at 15k miles. If you like to waste $$$ because it makes you feel better go right ahead.

The same oil change interval is to be followed for synthetic oil as for petroleum based oil. Also, synthetic oil must meet the same performance specifications as petroleum oil. CAUTION! Do not use chemical flushes in your engine oil as the chemicals can damage your engine. Such damage is not covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. Engine Oil Viscosity (SAE Grade) In ambient temperatures above 0°F (-18°C), we recommend you use SAE 15W-40 engine oil such as MOPAR, Shell Rotella and Shell Rimula that meets FCA Material Standard MS-10902 and the API CJ-4 engine oil category is required. Products meeting Cummins CES 20081 may also be used. The identification of these engine oils is typically located on the back of the oil container. In ambient temperatures below 0°F (-18°C), SAE 5W-40 we recommend you use synthetic engine oil such as MOPAR, Shell Rotella and Shell Rimula that meets FCA Material Standard MS-10902 and the API CJ-4 engine oil category is required. CAUTION! F
 

Fuel35 67

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I bet the turbo would love to have synthetic vs dino…..especially after being worked. Don’t want that oil cooking inside!
 

Gr8bawana

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Is that why there are millions upon millions of every brand using plain old dino oil with no ill-effects?
If using dino oil really did cause problems in the turbo the manufacturers would REQUIRE use of synthetic oil. They don't.
 

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Study after study study after study after study after study has shown....That regular oil and filter changes are mucho more important than what brand you use. Without going down the goober rabbit hole of "my'in is better 'an your'in", the factory full of engineers suggests changing the Cummins oil at a max interval of 15K miles, with shorter intervals for easier conditions, 7.5k miles if memory serves. Do that at 7.5K regardles and that s u m b it c h will run forever, or at least long enough to watch a couple of transmissions fall out of it.
 

Scottly

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I bet the turbo would love to have synthetic vs dino…..especially after being worked. Don’t want that oil cooking inside!
Which is why you let it idle for a few before shutting it down after working it hard...Because, simply put, that bearing may be hot enough to cook off any oil know, depending on how hard it was worked...Even synthetic oil with it's high breakdown temps.
 

Fuel35 67

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True, but the synthetic has oil is better, no matter what. What if ya can’t let it idle for a bit? I believe that if your running a turbo, you run synthetic, no exceptions.
 

06 Dodge

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The owners manual makes no mention of a longer oil change interval for synthetic or dino, they are the same.
Dino oil will do the job just as well. Wear and shear protection in dino oil is not going to suffer at 15k miles. If you like to waste $$$ because it makes you feel better go right ahead.

The same oil change interval is to be followed for synthetic oil as for petroleum based oil. Also, synthetic oil must meet the same performance specifications as petroleum oil. CAUTION! Do not use chemical flushes in your engine oil as the chemicals can damage your engine. Such damage is not covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. Engine Oil Viscosity (SAE Grade) In ambient temperatures above 0°F (-18°C), we recommend you use SAE 15W-40 engine oil such as MOPAR, Shell Rotella and Shell Rimula that meets FCA Material Standard MS-10902 and the API CJ-4 engine oil category is required. Products meeting Cummins CES 20081 may also be used. The identification of these engine oils is typically located on the back of the oil container. In ambient temperatures below 0°F (-18°C), SAE 5W-40 we recommend you use synthetic engine oil such as MOPAR, Shell Rotella and Shell Rimula that meets FCA Material Standard MS-10902 and the API CJ-4 engine oil category is required. CAUTION! F

FYI the OP has a 2022, Cummins 6.7L no longer use 15w40 oil, 10w30 is the oil to use or 5w40 Synthetic that can be used in any temp range on 2019 up engines... Also engines using more then 5% Bio Diesel need to shorten their OCI it must not exceed 12500 miles...
 

HEMIMANN

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FYI the OP has a 2022, Cummins 6.7L no longer use 15w40 oil, 10w30 is the oil to use or 5w40 Synthetic that can be used in any temp range on 2019 up engines... Also engines using more then 5% Bio Diesel need to shorten their OCI it must not exceed 12500 miles...

Yup - the biodiesel shortened OCI has always been the case with Cummins, but the 10W-30 is new. Somebody mentioned here it was when they redesigned the engine to put in hydraulic valve lifters.

Guessing oil flow rate was insufficient at startup and cold ambient with the 15W-40 used forever with solid lifters.
 

06 Dodge

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Yup - the biodiesel shortened OCI has always been the case with Cummins, but the 10W-30 is new. Somebody mentioned here it was when they redesigned the engine to put in hydraulic valve lifters.

Guessing oil flow rate was insufficient at startup and cold ambient with the 15W-40 used forever with solid lifters.
I've heard scuttle butt it was because the hydraulic lifters don't know if true or not... Being forced to use Bio diesel is another reason I recommend Synthetic oil, recall a few years ago talking to Cummins owners who mentioned how bio was very hard on oil based on UOA and to never go over 7500 OCI when using bio diesel of any kind, I listed to them being some had over 40 years of hands on diesel experience ie diesel mechanics .
 
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HEMIMANN

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I've heard scuttle butt it was because the hydraulic lifters don't know if true or not... Being forced to use Bio diesel is another reason I recommend Synthetic oil, recall a few years ago talking to Cummins owners who mentioned how bio was very hard on oil based on UOA and to never go over 7500 OCI when using bio diesel of any kind, I listed to them being some had over 40 years of hands on diesel experience ie diesel mechanics .

Did they say anything about why bio is hard on oil? I'd 'heard' it was the byproducts of combustion being dirtier - i.e. - from the fats in the soybean oil. It makes sense because the bean fat is also why biodiesel coagulates at a higher temp than waxy No. 2 diesel fuel, and also why it rots faster.

Biodiesel is ok for engines in regular use in warm climates. Anything else has scores of problems. Truckers up here in MN were pi$$ed the 1st winter of the biodiesel state mandate - stalling out all over the place. Gelled fuel filters.
 

06 Dodge

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Did they say anything about why bio is hard on oil? I'd 'heard' it was the byproducts of combustion being dirtier - i.e. - from the fats in the soybean oil. It makes sense because the bean fat is also why biodiesel coagulates at a higher temp than waxy No. 2 diesel fuel, and also why it rots faster.

Biodiesel is ok for engines in regular use in warm climates. Anything else has scores of problems. Truckers up here in MN were pi$$ed the 1st winter of the biodiesel state mandate - stalling out all over the place. Gelled fuel filters.
I fully understand the Gelled fuel problems, I lived 15 years in northerner Iowa off I-35 and recall the first year of Bio BS, MN made Mills Fleet Farm stop using there winter fuel additive because it did not work well with MN Bio or some BS, I liked it being I saw only a small fuel mileage & no power loss in the winter when using there winterized fuel compared to the old school of 70/30 #2 & #1 mix. As for shorter OCI for Bio I was also told it was do to it being dirtier then 100% diesel fuel, I was also told for the older 2006 older injectors 5% Bio help keep them lubed better then the ultra low diesel even though they claimed they added extra lubricity to the U15 fuel for the older engines injectors.. Oh I also recall one mechanic say that using 5% Bio is okay if your out on the road towing long distance, he said it should not be used for every day stop go driving...
 

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@06 Dodge - yep, your information matches mine exactly. Wear rig testing showed biodiesel had the highest lubricity of any diesel fuel additive. Next was Optilube.

I don't worry about diesel fuel lubrication anymore, I worry about degradation and gelling. And cetane. Then again, I only have a Yanmar diesel tractor, but my son has an old Ford Superduty with HEUI Navistar engine. But the expensive, new HPCR vehicle diesels can burn just about anything. As long as they don't have a Bosch CP4 pump!
 

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On my 2001 I used Rotella, Royal Purple, Amsoil, Lucas, Valvoline, Mobil 1, Quaker State and Penzoil a few times. Truck never knew the difference after I traded it in at 423,000 miles.

On the new one I’ll stick with the 10-30 synthetic.
 
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