Upgrades capable of towing maximum

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nlambert182

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Though the payload is higher than anticipated based off the build sheet, I still don't think the OP has enough powertrain to pull this trailer. My minimum recommendation (after getting the trailer weighed as it will be loaded to tow), is getting an appropriate rated 1500 with a 5.7 and better gearing. If towing up and down mountains, I absolutely suggest a 2500 with a 6.4. A 2500 with a 5.7 might do the job as well.
 
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tron67j

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Seeing those trailers all around, they often carry one or two generators in the bed, extra supplies, and a bunch of other stuff. OP should consider leasing a separate truck for the trailer. Canada appears to be similar to the US where 100% of the cost can be a business deduction. It has to be used 100% for the business, so keeping original truck is a must. This way the cost is finite and if the business isn't what they wanted, the lease eventually ends. But of course, consult a CPA to verify as I am not one nor have I played one on TV.
 

62Blazer

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I would tend to say at least hook it up and see how it does. Not like the truck won't physically be able to move the trailer around. Back when I was in high school I worked on farms and construction companies that pulled trailers everyday. 140 hp straight sixes in 3500 dually work trucks wasn't that unusual, and even "big block" V-8's were around 200 hp. Spent most of a summer on a concrete crew and drove around an early 1980's Chevy 3500 with a factory straight six with about a 10' flatbed loaded with concrete finishing equipment and regularly pulled skid loaders around that had trailer weight in the 8k-9k range. Sure, it was slow accelerating but you could easily run 55 mph on fairly flat roads. If running more local roads that are 55 mph speed limits max or slower, and around town, you have plenty of power to lug the thing around. The only time you would have a power issue is trying to pull grades on the freeway at 65 mph.......and again, not like the truck is somehow going to come to a stop halfway up a grade because it ran out of power..........
And just to clarify, I'm not saying the current V6 truck is the best option out there. If they decide to do this long-term and pulling it frequently I would consider a different truck, but the current truck will do it. At least try it out and see what happens!
 

nlambert182

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I would tend to say at least hook it up and see how it does. Not like the truck won't physically be able to move the trailer around. Back when I was in high school I worked on farms and construction companies that pulled trailers everyday. 140 hp straight sixes in 3500 dually work trucks wasn't that unusual, and even "big block" V-8's were around 200 hp. Spent most of a summer on a concrete crew and drove around an early 1980's Chevy 3500 with a factory straight six with about a 10' flatbed loaded with concrete finishing equipment and regularly pulled skid loaders around that had trailer weight in the 8k-9k range. Sure, it was slow accelerating but you could easily run 55 mph on fairly flat roads. If running more local roads that are 55 mph speed limits max or slower, and around town, you have plenty of power to lug the thing around. The only time you would have a power issue is trying to pull grades on the freeway at 65 mph.......and again, not like the truck is somehow going to come to a stop halfway up a grade because it ran out of power..........
And just to clarify, I'm not saying the current V6 truck is the best option out there. If they decide to do this long-term and pulling it frequently I would consider a different truck, but the current truck will do it. At least try it out and see what happens!
Inline 6 with low gearing is a different animal than a V6 with highway gears.

No, it might not run out of power but it could wear out the transmission, be difficult to stop, work the engine hard enough to overheat, etc... I wouldn't suggest it.

If it were me I would prefer the 2500 with a Cummins, but in all reality a gasser 2500 would pull this trailer just fine.
 

NotSoFast

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The earlier posts about the 2500 with the diesel are right: on a grade the exhaust brake is awesome. And since this is a regular gig, you may be doing those hills in slush and snow. Good tires for towing in that snow are an important factor in the safety equation. And surprisingly, a 2500 often doesn't cost that much more than a 1500. 7100 pounds is just getting it warmed up.
 

reddawg67

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According to your build sheet your payload is 1740 and looks like you should be able to pull it looks like you might be near your max is around 8120 trailer weight I believe with the 3:21 rear ends
 

nlambert182

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According to your build sheet your payload is 1740 and looks like you should be able to pull it looks like you might be near your max is around 8120 trailer weight I believe with the 3:21 rear ends
The OP has to factor in the actual weight of the trailer, weight of anything on/in the truck that didn't come factory (including passengers) before making that decision. Also important is that max trailer weight is mutually exclusive from payload. It's likely that the OP will bust payload before reaching the max trailer weight. The 3.6 V6 coupled with 3.21 gearing makes that truck a far less than ideal tow rig for a trailer that heavy.
 

2003F350

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The OP has to factor in the actual weight of the trailer, weight of anything on/in the truck that didn't come factory (including passengers) before making that decision. Also important is that max trailer weight is mutually exclusive from payload. It's likely that the OP will bust payload before reaching the max trailer weight. The 3.6 V6 coupled with 3.21 gearing makes that truck a far less than ideal tow rig for a trailer that heavy.

A 3.6 V6 coupled with 3.21 gearing is set up for highway mileage with a light-ish load in the bed. It's not really meant for pulling.

Wife's truck has the 3.6 eTorque with 3.55s - it is adequate for pulling a flatbed full of sleds or ATVs, but I wouldn't want much more behind it. Not that it WOULDN'T do it it just would struggle more than necessary.
 

colorado_alan

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If I read the tag right it shows GVWR of 6800 lbs. You can't do any upgrades that will get it up to the 7100 lbs of the trailer. FWIW I just bought (in Dec) a '22 1500 Laramie 5.7L with the 3.92 axle. It is rated at 11K+ towing capacity. Most 1500's with 3.21 gears are rated at 8100 +/-. I tow a travel trailer but the "rule of thumb" for towing any trailer is probalby the same - trailer GVWR should not be more than about 80% of the tow capacity of the truck. Unfortunately a 5.7 L HEMI is what you need.
 

gnyland

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BJones, that's not the payload info. It's white/yellow with the tire info on the "door frame".
It is unique to your vehicle, rated as equipped.
 

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Growing up with some really slow vehicles, I'm of the opinion that sometimes you deal with lousy performance and are ok with it. Sure, your truck could pull that trailer, especially with some upgrades/mods. That said, there's a huge difference between could and should.

Towing with a trailer weight above your maximum rating from the manufacturer opens you up to a world of hurt liability-wise in the event of a serious accident. DOT's look at stuff like that in accident investigations, and lawyers look at it for lawsuits.

While you can upgrade a vehicle to the equivalent of one with a higher tow rating, your tow rating is still as the vehicle was originally equipped.
 

nlambert182

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Unless you're towing a flatbed trailer, or a trailer where you can adjust the position of the cargo to offset the tongue weight, max trailer weights are irrelevant. If the cargo is in a fixed position (like freezers, cookers, refrigerators, etc...) , you need to use payload and tongue weight. You can (and most often will) run out of payload long before you hit the max trailer weight rating of the truck.
 
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2003F350

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Unless you're towing a flatbed trailer, or a trailer where you can adjust the position of the cargo to offset the tongue weight, max trailer weights are irrelevant. If the cargo is in a fixed position (like freezers, cookers, refrigerators, etc...) , you need to use payload and tongue weight. You can (and most often will) run out of payload long before you hit the max trailer weight rating of the truck.
This right here. If you're looking at an RV, you basically need to ignore the trailer's GVW and focus on the hitch weight and your payload/axle ratings on your truck. You can't 'rearrange' the guts of an RV to hit your max trailer tow number and still be inside your other ratings.

On any other kind of trailer, to at least some extent you can reconfigure your load so the axles take more of the load, meaning you can hit higher trailer weights and still be inside your truck's specs.

Also remember that any truck's 'max trailer weight rating' is a bogus number based off of getting a load moving to a set speed within a certain amount of time/distance, and then STOPPING that load within another set time/distance. It isn't a true number, or at least not one that is useful for pulling an RV.
 

reddawg67

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Options very as much as opinions my 2017 with the 5.7 and 321 gears is rated for 8200and I believe my max payload is around 1860#.My camper I use to have was a 35 ft dry weights of 7100 had no issues even in the wind I have the air bags just for level and used weight distribution hitch with anti sway bars . Was at the top end of my weight limits but did just find and averaged around 12 to 13 mpg . My empty average was 19 to 21
 
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KSell5500

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We live in N.W PA and well anywhere we want to go outside of our immediate areas is either up or down a mountain. I attached a pic but with it being night I can't seem to get the whole thing clear.
I'm guessing the weight you stated above is a "dry" weight. If so, you might want to consider what it'll weigh when you pack it full (fuel, food, cutlery, your stool, camping chairs, etc.). My guess is you'll be over your towing capacity. You've already stated your truck wouldn't pull it...
I would be more concerned about STOPPING it when I'm coming down a mountain... When you drive overloaded you eventually pay the price.
 

truck2014

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Bags do nothing for towing capacity, they are for leveling only. Post up a picture of your door jamb sticker with your

They do a bit more than just level , it always been said it doesn’t change the rating of a truck , but does change its capability . Nothing changes the door sticker unless you have it changed thru the state .
 

nlambert182

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They do a bit more than just level , it always been said it doesn’t change the rating of a truck , but does change its capability . Nothing changes the door sticker unless you have it changed thru the state .
They literally don't do anything more than level. The weight sitting on the axle doesn't change because you add airbags. The weight is still sitting on the axle as it was before.

People adopt that mindset and overload their trucks because they can make it look level again and it's a false sense of security. The truck is no more capable than it was before the bags.
 

2003F350

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They do a bit more than just level , it always been said it doesn’t change the rating of a truck , but does change its capability . Nothing changes the door sticker unless you have it changed thru the state .
They level the truck and CAN make it feel more stable in the corners because it eliminates body roll, but only in regards to weight in the bed of the truck. When it comes to a trailer, that doesn't really cause any body roll because the weight is really low comparatively.

Otherwise, they don't do anything. They eliminate squat but can, if you're not careful, allow you to overload the truck and actually cause damage. Does it happen often? I can't say. It is possible though, because 'well it's still level, add some more weight!'
 
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