Upgrades capable of towing maximum

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truck2014

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They level the truck and CAN make it feel more stable in the corners because it eliminates body roll, but only in regards to weight in the bed of the truck. When it comes to a trailer, that doesn't really cause any body roll because the weight is really low comparatively.

Otherwise, they don't do anything. They eliminate squat but can, if you're not careful, allow you to overload the truck and actually cause damage. Does it happen often? I can't say. It is possible though, because 'well it's still level, add some more weight!'

I agree , the thread was a bumper pull , I was thinking more a camper , and sway , hence more capable nothing more .
 

62Blazer

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This right here. If you're looking at an RV, you basically need to ignore the trailer's GVW and focus on the hitch weight and your payload/axle ratings on your truck. You can't 'rearrange' the guts of an RV to hit your max trailer tow number and still be inside your other ratings.

On any other kind of trailer, to at least some extent you can reconfigure your load so the axles take more of the load, meaning you can hit higher trailer weights and still be inside your truck's specs.

Also remember that any truck's 'max trailer weight rating' is a bogus number based off of getting a load moving to a set speed within a certain amount of time/distance, and then STOPPING that load within another set time/distance. It isn't a true number, or at least not one that is useful for pulling an RV.
The SAE J2807 trailer towing test does take into account handling, and just not acceleration and stopping. It has a section called "combination handling requirements". This includes testing to determine understeer (tongue or bed weight which unloads the front axle) and sway control. I agree that you should take the numbers with a grain of salt, but there is more to it. At least when this standard became available you have a better chance of an "apples to apples" comparison of trucks made by different manufacturers.
 

nlambert182

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True. Too bad they don't do them with a tall box trailer to simulate RVs. That seems to be where so many get hung up.
 

2003F350

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The SAE J2807 trailer towing test does take into account handling, and just not acceleration and stopping. It has a section called "combination handling requirements". This includes testing to determine understeer (tongue or bed weight which unloads the front axle) and sway control. I agree that you should take the numbers with a grain of salt, but there is more to it. At least when this standard became available you have a better chance of an "apples to apples" comparison of trucks made by different manufacturers.

You're right, when it comes to a base trailer like a flatbed or even an enclosed equipment trailer, the specs can give you a 'max tow rating' that stays within the other specs of the truck - because you can move that weight around on the trailer.

But as stated above, they almost need to break it down further and have a 'sub category' for RV trailers, because you can't really adjust the weight distribution of the trailer - its tongue weight has a minimum that is basically static (the 'dry' hitch weight). You would be hard-pressed to get that number to stay the same or go down as you load up the RV - the majority of the time that number is going to go up and can go up a LOT, which will quickly put a lot of trucks over their payload and/or axle ratings (which are arguably more important). About the only towable RVs that can end up with a lighter hitch weight are toy haulers, but those are generally heavier from the get-go anyway.
 

Jas34

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An interesting discussion of the SAE J2807 and setup of a weight distribution hitch here:

 

nlambert182

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Definitely an interesting read and very detailed. I appreciate that he's recording his test results.
 

62Blazer

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You're right, when it comes to a base trailer like a flatbed or even an enclosed equipment trailer, the specs can give you a 'max tow rating' that stays within the other specs of the truck - because you can move that weight around on the trailer.

But as stated above, they almost need to break it down further and have a 'sub category' for RV trailers, because you can't really adjust the weight distribution of the trailer - its tongue weight has a minimum that is basically static (the 'dry' hitch weight). You would be hard-pressed to get that number to stay the same or go down as you load up the RV - the majority of the time that number is going to go up and can go up a LOT, which will quickly put a lot of trucks over their payload and/or axle ratings (which are arguably more important). About the only towable RVs that can end up with a lighter hitch weight are toy haulers, but those are generally heavier from the get-go anyway.
Pretty much agree. The J2807 doesn't take into account every aspect by any means. I pull an 18' tandem axle car hauler that weighs in loaded around 9k, but a 32' enclosed trailer that weighs 9k pulls much differently. However the J2807 at least gives a reasonable baseline. You could get as detailed as you want on the test, but the issue is there are so many people out there that would never pay attention to the numbers. Payload, tongue load, total weight, weight distributing hitches, trailer brakes, etc.......never ceases to amaze me how many people I talk to that tow trailers but have zero clue about any of the above.
 

nlambert182

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Pretty much agree. The J2807 doesn't take into account every aspect by any means. I pull an 18' tandem axle car hauler that weighs in loaded around 9k, but a 32' enclosed trailer that weighs 9k pulls much differently. However the J2807 at least gives a reasonable baseline. You could get as detailed as you want on the test, but the issue is there are so many people out there that would never pay attention to the numbers. Payload, tongue load, total weight, weight distributing hitches, trailer brakes, etc.......never ceases to amaze me how many people I talk to that tow trailers but have zero clue about any of the above.
Hey Bill, the back tires are rubbing the fenders but it didn't break the axle! Hey Bob - send it!
 
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